GlyNAC

Has anyone tried Glycine/N-acetylcysteine?  It appears to have amazing effects on age reversal. 

Glycine and N‐acetylcysteine (GlyNAC) supplementation in older adults improves glutathione deficiency, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, genotoxicity, muscle strength, and cognition: Results of a pilot clinical trial
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ctm2.372

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  • I’m wondering why it wouldn’t be easier just to supplement with Glutathione?

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    • Curt Lizzi  Glutathione does not absorb well through the digestive system from the research I've seen.

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    • Charles Richardson I thought that might be the reason. Also wondering why they only used 2 of the 3 AAs that make up Glutathione?

      this would be a protocol that would be hard to follow long term just because of the volume!

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    • Curt Lizzi I think it would be hard to be deficient in glutamic acid (that's my understanding).

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    • Charles Richardson They used to think that but current research has debunked it and apparently it is absorbed which is why they started selling it as a supplement now. Now having said that, it may pass the first obstacle in the gut, but it may only enter circulation and not penetrate the cell membrane. But still therapeutic for the liver etc.

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      • Chris M
      • Chris_M
      • 2 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Curt Lizzi They only use 2 of the 3 as those are the only ones that decrease with age.  The third one is found in young and old at similar levels and does not decrease with age.

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  • Although small trials, those two studies on the effects of glycine and NAC are about the most astounding  I have seen for anti-aging effects.

    The doses, 7 and 9 g per day, are high, but as I understand it only enough to restore Glutathione to youthful levels. No side effects reported during the trials.

    Could any fairly long-term user of glycine + NAC report? 

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  • I am in my 60's and have completed 31 weeks of  NAC and glycine daily at the levels set out in the study.  I have experienced nowhere near the results set out in that study.  I may have experienced a small amount of increased ability in my half hour runs. I have strength trained regularly for quite a few years and if there were any gains in strength I would know it.  There have not been gains in strength.

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  • I've been taking glycine (4000mg), serine (900mg) and NAC (1200mg) daily for about six months. I'm 50 so the lower dose is intended as a top-up that I might scale as I get older.

    Only thing I noticed is if going out for a drink with friends the next day tends to be much easier, almost like those youthful days. No liver inflammation, no headache. Interpret this as having more glutathione in the liver to mop up aldehydes and other by-products. 

    Don't know what to think about the topic as anti-oxidants are clearly important, but then non chronic stressors are good for the body by stimulating repair, does this supplementation risk having too few stressors? Difficult to know where the balance ideally is.

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    • Jack Black For info I've noticed something else recently. Based on discussions on this forum I decided to raise my daily dose of AKG from 300mg a day to 1200mg. As such I now bundle a 300mg capsule with the glycine/serine/NAC detailed above just before bedtime. Since starting that I've been sleeping like a baby! 

      Not seen anything saying that AKG would be synergistic with the sleep promoting aspects of l-serine but that's the experience these past two weeks. Would be interested if anyone else has experienced this?

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      • Brian Valerie
      • Semi-Retired Health Education Teacher
      • Brian_Valerie
      • 2 yrs ago
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      Jack Black I take 4200mg of NAC along with 4000mg of the reportedly somnorific glycine every other day (alternating with 3000mg of the somnorific anti-inflammatory ashwagandha in the perhaps vain hope of diminishing potential homeostatic responses), and believe that the reported somnorific effect of glycine is indeed valid.  I also take 1200mg of AKG and 3mg of 6 hour extended release melatonin on a nightly basis, so must caution that my anecdotal evidence is suspiciously full of confounding variables.

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  • Would there be any reason to believe that the Celltrient version of GlyNAC is compounded or whatever in some sort of way that would be superior, more effective than we get with the cheaper route of sourcing and taking separate glycine and NAC pills?

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      • Michael
      • Michael.2
      • 2 yrs ago
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      Reversaroni I can't speak to the Celltrient version, but I can tell you that without any doubt, the quality of NAC on the market varies wildly. I've seen reports of some products (commonly available on sites like Amazon at relatively cheap prices) containing little to no NAC it all, which is very disturbing, but points to the fact that we must be cognizant of the quality of products we choose. Far too often I find people choosing cost over quality and from what I've seen, the old age that you get what you pay for is very true. With that said, in all studies I've seen regardless of what subject we're discussing, the higher doses of NAC are required in order to achieve the same outcomes found in the research (I've seen some people take 600-1200mg for COPD for a month and claim the product doesn't work, but the research points to much higher doses of 3-3.6g/daily, so it's no wonder these individuals had dismal results - not withstanding the fact that they are likely consuming substandard products). In addition to that, the research seems to suggest that it takes time for it to work. In one of the studies of GlyNAC I was reading, the study lasted for 24 weeks which is a sufficient amount of time to demontrate the efficacy of a protocol. Given the complexity of the situation, you're not  going to improve COPD symptoms in a matter of 3-4 weeks, no are you going to experience any miraculous anti aging benefits in the same time period. So for people that think that 3-4 weeks is enough time to allow for this protocol to work, they're fooling themselves and likely throwing money down the drain 

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  • Thanks Michael  - What I think I'm gathering from this thread regarding NAC sourcing is that Thorne labs and Ajipure versions are considered by some to be in the higher quality realm.

    Anyone have additional thoughts or recommendations for good sources of NAC?

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      • Chris M
      • Chris_M
      • 2 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Reversaroni I am buying the NOW brand of NAC and glycine as I have found their brand to be pretty good.  Has anyone had problems with NOW supplements?  I get them through Walmart online.

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    • Chris M 

      NOW is a good brand. (Speaking of someone who has been in or around the supplement business for a long time.)

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  • Can anyone comment on this article which argues nac shortens life span? https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-24634-3
     

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      • J Oh
      • J_Oh
      • 2 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Stevan Lieberman interesting. Wonder why the conflicting results. Dosage maybe? Also concerning that it says NAC negates the benefits of exercise.

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    • Stevan Lieberman I can't derive an equivalent human dose from the paper, but these are usually way higher than people would take. I would imagine some ROS action in humans would indeed be beneficial. My approach is small top-ups of GlyNAC in my 50s, working up to 9mg or so in later life. It does seem there's an increasing antioxidant deficit through age related decline.

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      • Brian Valerie
      • Semi-Retired Health Education Teacher
      • Brian_Valerie
      • 2 yrs ago
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      Jack Black I'm guessing you meant to write 9 grams rather than 9mg (?).  As noted above, I'm taking four grams qod, and admit to being shy about taking more chronically until we have more human research results.

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    • Brian Valerie Absolutely! Grams not mg. :)  I'd say taking a week off the supplements every month sounds like a good move for most of these substances.

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  • I also note this: "Quite intriguingly recent preclinical studies confirmed the pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic effects of antioxidant supplementation such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor [155156], thus highlighting the relevance of antioxidants in the protection of cancer cells against oxidative damage. Therefore, antioxidant supplementation can promote the growth of tumors by rescuing the viability of cells under high oxidative stress." https://clintransmed.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40169-016-0106-5 which cites https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/scitranslmed.3007653 and https://www.science.org/doi/abs/10.1126/scitranslmed.aad3740

    Thoughts?

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    • Stevan Lieberman Sounds like a good case for senolytics?

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    • Jack Black Yes, that is def why we need senolytics

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    • Stevan Lieberman Another thought; It's been shown that human glutathione levels tend to start declining dramatically around age 45. Correlation does not mean causation but it is interesting how many nasty age related diseases start to gather steam after about that same point. Mediating that decline in glutathione just seems sensible. 

      Taking NAC before bed time as some recommend also sounds good. Some ROS from the morning exercise and day of sun exposure and eating will have stressed something by the time you call it a night.

      Also, these animal studies are usually very high dose and lifelong. I suspect there's a big difference giving these supplements lifelong compared to e.g. after age 45 in humans in moderation. Though firm data would indeed be very nice.

      My reading of the origin of most cancers is that they result from chronic non-fatal stressors on cells, that eventually make the cell flip out and revert to the single celled [selfish] organism programming [to survive] instead of part of a multicellular lifeform. (Because all life was single celled before multi cellular life evolved so it seems reasonable there is still the selfish programming in all cells buried somewhere). 

      There is truth that stressors in moderation turn on protection mechanisms, and it's all about finding that balance. As stated above, past the age of 45 you're heading in the wrong direction and need support.

      On the topic of cancer itself, there are interesting resources. Check out "Eat to Beat" which studies how various foods seem to disrupt cancer angiogenesis (forming blood vessels). The usual foods talked about for e.g. stopping bowel cancer are all there.

      At the risk of me entering the "too much information for a single post" category; A diet rich in certain beans (soya, black eye and others) was recently shown to help stop cancer cells from metastasizing, which is the reason for most cancer fatalities. I mention this just to say diet can be used in conjunction with things like GlyNAC to alleviate possible downsides and enjoy the upsides.

      There's a lot of information out there to process and combine...  

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