Intro to rapamycin

Hello everyone,

Rapamycin is an mTOR inhibitor. It has been used for years to prevent organ transplant rejection in humans, in part because mTOR inhibition also inhibits the immune system. 

mTOR is a pro-growth factor that is involved in cellular growth and protein synthesis. Its inhibition has been associated with longer lifespans in certain organisms (not yet humans). 

Rapamycin administration has been shown to extend the remaining lifespan of middle-aged mice, making it an interesting life-extension candidate for use in middle-aged humans. 

Has anyone tried rapamycin? What were the results? 

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  • I have been in the study now for about 8 months now.  I can't tell any difference, but I do get the side effect of mouth sores once in a while.  The study is a year long with many blood tests to monitor us.  We should be meeting soon as a group.  We haven't done that since the beginning of the study.  We can compare notes.

    Reply Like 1
    • loveyouyrlongevity .... there is a study on c. Eligans and fruit flies where the the food component allantoin found in sprouting wheat germ and allo Vera, doubles the life extension effect of rapamycin... summary...actually there were many synergistic drug combinations graphs. Odly metformin was absent.

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    • are we there yet  ....  The study is over now.  I am waiting to see what the results of the year show, if anything.  I have read that they now think that the 5 mg a week is not enough.  We shall see when the results are tabulated what that dosage meant for participants.  I have not heard about what you bring up, but I am sure as we travel down this road we shall find more refinements to the regimine .  

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    • loveyouyrlongevity ..... my self experimenting with sirolimus (rapamycin) has shown a clear near elimination of left knee arthritus pain. I am 70 on a 10 day interval of 2mg.

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  • loveyouyrlongevity Thanks for sharing your story. I think many people will be very interested to hear your ongoing experiences, especially that chat with the group when you can compare notes. 

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  • I am now in Year 2 of Rapamycin @ 5mg daily.  Have observed a 10 pound weight loss.  No problems other that at about 10 months in I developed periodic nausea with vomiting which I contribute to thinning of the mucosal  tissues.  I cannot be certain that Rapamycin was the cause and my conventional  doc said he though it was but didn't know anything about Rapamycin as a life-extension protocol.  Of course I provided him all of the DR. Blagsklonny studies,information as well as Dr. Green's website.  Bottom line I took several months off, the problem resolved and I am back on Rapamycin....BTW I am now purchasing from the new site referenced in the blog.  Paid via an e check and received the product withing two weeks.  Smooth transaction. I am also taking NAD+ via electrophoresis  patches. I have an account under NAD+ Blog.

    Reply Like 1
      • AWaller
      • AWaller
      • 7 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      David Michel I am assuming 5mg daily was a typo? Surely you mean weekly, no?

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      • djmichel
      • CDR Phx
      • djmichel
      • 7 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      David Michel Yes, a type,  should be 5mg weekly

      Reply Like 1
      • djmichel
      • CDR Phx
      • djmichel
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David Michel Typo, should be 5mg weekly.

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      • nealfg
      • nealfg
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      djmichel .....Would you please spell out your pharmacy source for Rapamycin, please. 

      And how $ much?  I'm just starting my self-trial and looking for $$$-saving source.

      The suspense is terrible; hope it lasts.....nealfg

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  • Web MD has this to say in part about Rapamycin:  Rapamycin can cause mouth sores, cataracts, and diabetes. It can also raise the risks of infection, bleeding, and some types of cancers, such as skin cancer. It can cause high blood pressurefever, and anemia. How big of a concern are this potential issues? https://www.webmd.com/special-reports/anti-aging-science/20170329/anti-aging-pill

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      • AWaller
      • AWaller
      • 6 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Marc Someone who knows better should either correct me, or confirm what I write, but it was my interpretation that the WebMD article refers to side effects that may be observed in patients who have undergone organ transplant surgery, and are not only taking higher doses of Rapamycin daily, but also other powerful drugs in combination.
      The article does not specify the actual dose nor the frequency of Rapamycin they are prescribed (it really should!) nor what healthy people wanting anti-aging benefits should take. So in that respect I find the WebMD article a little vague in evaluating the actual dangers, and thereby potentially misleading to the downside.
      What I can gleam from reading the research on https://rapamycintherapy.com is that the longevity benefits for healthy humans relies on a strict dosage protocol of no more than 5mg per week.
      Like the old adage; the poison is in the dose. Any substance can be a lethal if taken in excess; even water (hyponatremia). 

      Reply Like 2
  • Out of all the risks you list, the only one I have known is the mouth sores once in a while.  Our study will wrap up very soon.  I am told we will meet again as a group at the end of this.  At least one of us comes from Canada.  As with all things, I imagine what you experience will have to do with individual DNA and lifestyle choices.

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  • I just received my first delivery of Rapamycin today. Should I take it on an empty stomach or with food? Is it best in the morning or at night before retiring, or does it not matter?

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  • I take it after breakfast.  I don't recall anyone saying anything about a best time, so I take it with the rest of my supplements.

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  • I take 5mg every Monday morning,  I take it on an empty stomach as I do not want it competing with other supplements.  That way I am assured I am getting the full dose.  Does not cause any distress.

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      • AWaller
      • AWaller
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David Michel I just spotted in another thread on this site about rapamycin in which 'BrianMDelaney' suggested taking 5 mg with a fatty meal, because of 30% better absorption than on empty stomach.

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      • djmichel
      • CDR Phx
      • djmichel
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      AWaller Interesting, I'll try that.

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  •     I think Bill is now recommending that if you're suppressing AMPK sufficiently via lifestyle and Metformin then the Rapamycin isn't necessary. 

    Reply Like 1
      • AWaller
      • AWaller
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      DanMcL correct me if I'm wrong, but shouldn't one be activating AMPK rather than suppressing it?
      Typos aside, (and there seem to be a few on this thread :-)) please point me to where this particular recommendation of Bill's was voiced, as I have just started Rapamycin 5 weeks ago, and would like to know if he has made any such revision since.
      I am sure you must be aware of the site pointed out to us on other places on this site, but in case not: https://rapamycintherapy.com

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      • Danmoderator
      • skipping my funeral
      • dantheman
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
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      AWaller Yes thanks, typo. 

      I believe it was a recent update at the COPL channel. Worth going through the videos there, IIRC a recent talk by Bill is where he mentioned that they're finding that folks in these studies who already practice healthy lifestyles and are taking metformin that the Rapa step can be skipped. Pretty sure I've heard him say this on a few occasions, I'll dig around and see if I can find references but worth joining COPL if you haven't It's wacky, but my kind of wacky. 

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      • AWaller
      • AWaller
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      DanMcL Ok, I'll check it out. Thanks

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      • Danmoderator
      • skipping my funeral
      • dantheman
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      AWaller OK Bill and team just sent out a email update where he says

       

      "Rapamycin update


      A drug called rapamycin has been shown to markedly increase lifespan in every animal model tested.

      Initial reports from a pioneering doctor indicated substantive regenerative benefits in response to 5 mg a week of rapamycin taken along with daily metformin and other AMPK-activating compounds.

      Interim results from a clinical study, and feedback from our supporters, indicate that this dose of rapamycin (5 mg/week) may be too low.

      A clinical study on higher-dose weekly rapamycin is being planned.

      Until we verify safety/efficacy of this higher rapamycin dose, please consider lowering mTOR by using AMPK-activating interventions such as:

      • Metformin and/or
      • Restricted eating (including various forms of intermittent fasting) and/or
      • Nutrients like gynostemma pentaphyllum and hesperidin.

      When AMPK activity is increased in cells, mTOR is indirectly suppressed and autophagy is initiated. Autophagy is the removal of accumulated waste from inside old cells. It is an important step in restoring cellular functionality.

      When excess mTOR is lowered, autophagy can help rid old cells of toxic debris.

      We made a change in my video presentation to reflect our current view that the first step to age reversal is to boost AMPK activity via several validated methods."

       

      So it looks from this that the 5mg/week dosing of Rapamycin is too low, and that it is important to activate AMPK via metformin. WIP.

      I started Metformin for multiple reasons, did NAD patches, and will approach Rapamycin soon as more is known about dosing. 

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      • Danmoderator
      • skipping my funeral
      • dantheman
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Update from the linked video; hot off the press "There is a change in the first step to substitute metformin and various forms of calorie reduction in lieu of rapamycin

      Current studies indicate a higher dose of rapamycin may be needed and a clinical trial is needed to validate safety and efficacy of the higher rapamycin dose

       

      So, hold off on the Rapaymycin until higher dosage safety can be established. 

      Reply Like 1
      • Iðunn
      • Iunn
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
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      DanMcL As I've posted elsewhere, it's not clear that metformin inhibits mTOR to any significant degree outside of the liver, and it clearly cannot substitute for rapamycin.

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      • Danmoderator
      • skipping my funeral
      • dantheman
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Iðunn Just relaying Bills message, and regardless he’s not saying Met replaces Rapa.

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      • Iðunn
      • Iunn
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      DanMcL Huh? You quoted him as saying "There is a change in the first step to substitute metformin and various forms of calorie reduction in lieu of rapamycin"

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  • There are many people here who are uninformed about the science of anti-ageing using Rapamycin and Metformin.  Here is an article by Mikhail V. Blagosklonny, MD.

    He is considered the number one leading authority on ageing and treatment of such. Rapa and Metformin complement each other. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6286826/

    also: https://www.aging-us.com/

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