NUCHIDO

Has anyone tried the NAD booster Nuchido?  They had products for sale at RAADfest and went live with online sales recently.  

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  • I have bought 3 months supply for £135.00 plus £4.00 shipping in UK. Started on it today. There are further details of the ingredients shown on the bottle but I had found it on the website as well. It took me long time to find it on website and it’s on the other side of the bottle. 

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  • It was 3 months supply of Nuchido Time+ for Nad.

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  • I look forward to hearing about your experience with it!

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  • I will provide  my experience of using Nuchido’s Time+ in due course

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  • I've been taking it for a few days now as well; the little caffeine boost is nice :)

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  • Does anyone else get a “Theranos” vibe watching her talk?

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  • Hi, I have been giving time+ to my mother for 7weeks from when it was first released, she was in late stage Alzheimer's, she was not talking, not eating, drinking small amounts of soup only, not moving in bed, her hands where shaking, shouting out, she is now, eating proper meals, talking reading magazines, can tell the time, she's back walking, not shaking, she has been  reversed by 50% so far, absolutely amazing, you would have to see it to believe it, she will be 94today, thank you nuchido. 😀

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    • Garnett Faulkner 

      Wow, that's very encouraging progess, really pleased for your mother. 

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      • bill moore
      • bill_moore
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Garnett Faulkner WOW! Garnett that is unbelievable. One of the first reviews Ive seen , I got mine today Im super excited to see the progress, any other changes in the last two weeks?

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    • bill moore 

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    • bill moore the latest is she can now tell the time again, she been on time+ and nad nasel spray,about 10weeks, it's a slow recovery,but it's better than going backwards. 

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    • Garnett Faulkner I think the nad nasal spray is important as it gets into the brain quick. 

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      • bill moore
      • bill_moore
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Garnett Faulkner I hear ya! Thats awesome progress in a short time, keep me posted for any further progress for I am putting my mom on there as well!

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      • Karl
      • Karl.1
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Garnett Faulkner what is source of nad nasal spray

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    • Karl I get mine from alive by nature ordering it online, from the USA. 

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    • bill moore good, make sure you get the nasel spray as well, I get mine from alive by nature online, from the USA, I do 2sprays up each nostril, twice a day morning and evening 

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  • She's also been having nad+ nasel spray, and 2 capsule of ashwaganda per day. 

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  •     I have spent some time going over the Nuchido site and chasing down some interviews with its CEO Dr. Nichola Conlon.  They are at the very beginning of their commercial operation, but it looks fairly impressive.  I have ordered a 180 bottle of Time+, and my wife and I will try it for 2 weeks and see what we think.

         The Nuchido site provides some links to scientific publications.   Most of these are journal publications a few years old discussing various aspects of NAD+ levels and aging.  However, the first reference in the list, which may be downloaded from this LINK, is a .pdf of a poster with Conlon as first author apparently presented at the poster session of some unspecified scientific meeting.  It described the work on which the commercial Time+ product is based.  (Warning: the type is way too small to read if you print out the file on letter-size paper.  I recommend opening it with a PDF Reader, zooming until you can read the type, and panning around to examine the various sections.)

        Let me describe what I learned from the poster.  The NAD+ consumed by the body produces a residue that is recycled to make new NAD+.  As the body ages, this recycling degrades, resulting in the age-related NAD+ deficiency.  The authors have used the (unspecified) methods of Systems Pharmacology to identify a number of natural supplements (see below) that boost the recycling process.  An unspecified cocktail of these supplements was used in the work described.

        The work used two human volunteers as subjects, an 57 year old male and a 48 year old female.  The subjects were given oral doses of "Interventions" over a two week period, given at 4 PM each day because this is the NAD+ low point.  The subjects provided many blood samples that were analyzed for NAD+ levels as well as levels of SIRT1 and NAMPT.  Judging from poster pictures, the blood analysis involved chromatography.

         Intervention NCD201.1 was the recycle boost cocktail plus the NAD+ precursor Nicotinamide Riboside (NR).  It was observed that following the 2-week treatment, the subject's NAD+ level was boosted by "344%", i.e., by a boost factor of 3.44.  Intervention NCD202 did the same procedure with the NR omitted.  This boosted the NAD+ level by a factor of 1.7.  Note that this is about the same as provided by taking NR or NMN as daily supplements.

         Both NR and NMN are fairly expensive, so the team decided to do a third trial with relatively inexpensive but less bio-available Niacin in the form of Nicotinamide as the precursor.   The results were spectacular.  The NAD+ level was boosted by a factor of 9.62.  Apparently, the strategy of boosting the recycling process rather than just providing it with precursor inputs yields huge NAD+ increases.

         We note that Nuchido Time+ is stated to provide a NAD+ boost of only a factor of 2.42.  Apparently they have throttled back the boost factor, probably in the interest of caution.  Here is the contents statement from the Time+ bottle:

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      • JGC
      • JGC
      • 3 wk ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Update:

          In the above post, I was implicitly assuming that the Interventions NCD201.1 and NCD201.2, as described in the 2019 poster, and Nuchido's commercial Time+ product had more or less the same mix of ingredients.  However, I found a 11/2019 post by Oakman on Longecity.org that describes the content of these, and they are rather different. It appears that Alpha Lipoic Acid and Niacin are the only common ingredients between NCD201.2 and Time+. Here are the contents:

      NCD201.1
      (produces a x3.44 boost in NAD+)
      Nicotinamide Riboside (NR)   1,000 mg
      Quercetin                                   1,125 mg
      Resveratrol                                   400 mg
      Alpha Lipoic Acid                         600 mg
      Apigenin                                        600 mg

      NCD201.2
      (produces a x9.62 boost in NAD+)
      Nicotinamide (Niacin)             1,000 mg
      Quercetin                                  1,125 mg
      Resveratrol                                  400 mg
      Alpha Lipoic Acid                        600 mg
      Apigenin                                      600 mg

      Nuchido Time+ (contents of 3 capsules = 1 serving taken twice daily)
      (produces a x2.42 boost in NAD+)
      Nicotinamide (Niacin)               250 mg
      Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C)            10 mg
      Alpha Lipoic Acid                       300 mg
      Zinc  Cirtate                                    5 mg
      Prop. blend, net wt.               1,100 mg
          green tea extract (contains 3 mg of caffeine)
          parsley leaf powder
          rutin extract
          black pepper fruit extract powder
          (Note: exact amounts are unknown)

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      • David H
      • David_Hanson
      • 3 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      JGC I wonder why Nuchido didn't stick with the NCD201.2.  It has the highest boost. 

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    • JGC Yeah that nuchido formula is really disappointing. Geez, they didnt even put apigenin in it, why?

      Regarding the NCD201 formulas, that is really interesting that the regular niacin formula outperforms the NR fomula? What in the world?

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    • David H Suspect with high levels of nicotinamide there may be unacceptable increase in liver enzyme( transferases).

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      • JGC
      • JGC
      • 3 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Fred Cloud 

      I think the "parsley leaf powder" is supposed to supply the Apigenin.  And the "green tea extract" is supposed to provide the flavenoids.  However, it isn't clear how much is actually in those herbal supplements.

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    • JGC I think you are right. Its just another step in obfuscating the formula to keep people from ripping it off. Supplement companies can use "proprietary blend" to keep the public from knowing exact amounts of each ingredient, but they have gone a step further by using the botanical source of parsely powder rather than being explicit and stating apigenin. So on one hand they hid the formula pretty impressively but so much so that a knowledgable person like me ends up being unimpressed by the label. I think they sort of shot themselves in the foot.

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  • I can think of two reasons: (1) They could patent their Proprietary Blend or keep it a trade secret, and (2) boosting NAD+ by almost a factor of 10 is possibly dangerous overkill, since the falloff with age is only perhaps a factor of 2. However, some individuals on longecity.org seem to be putting together own versions of NCD201.2 to take themselves, so perhaps we will soon have reports of possible side effects.

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      • JGC
      • JGC
      • 3 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      NAD+ vs Age

      FYI, here's a graph of some measurements of NAD+ vs age in humans.

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  • Primary Source of NCD201 Ingredients

    I found the primary source of the NCD201.1 ingredients listed above.   It is from a patent application by Conlon, and can be viewed at this LINK.   It includes this table:

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      • David H
      • David_Hanson
      • 2 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      JGC Good find, lower on the resveratrol than I would take. Higher on the apigenin than I take 100mg plus an unknown amount in parsley extract powder. Have you seen any research on how much apigenin to take daily?

      My understanding is that CD38 protein increases as we age and that causes NAD+ to decrease. Apigenin inhibits CD38. I have no idea how much apigenin to take to optimize that inhibition. The apigenin I take is in 50mg capsules so it take 12 to get to 600mg.

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      • JGC
      • JGC
      • 2 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Parsley extract powder is supposed to be 13% Apigenin. I just ordered enough powder forms of all the NCD201.2 ingredients to make about 100 doses from VitaSpace.com. They didn't carry powdered Apigenin, so I ordered a 1 kg bag of Parsley extract powder. Think Green!

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      • David H
      • David_Hanson
      • 2 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      JGC Thank you, 1 tsp is 2500mg per the Bulksupplements bag which at 13% is 325mg apigenin. 

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