Kaufmannprotocol

Anybody following Dr. Sandra Kaufmann's protocol?

I would like to hear about your experience.

Thanks

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  • Reading the book now. Have not started the protocol yet. Tell me your results please

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    • Thank  you for your answer, I am female, 57 and have been taking practically all the recommended molecular agents  for 10 months now. My results: definitely more energy, far better sleep, better mental sharpness, probably better skin, lost weight eating the same (didn't have any big issues with weight to start with but still lost about 3 kg) and a good overall feeling (maybe only due to the fact I am doing something against aging).  The cons: loads of pills to swallow.

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  • I'm getting the book soon and will use it to create a program for us. I've got a number of supplements we take already but it's a hodgepodge made up of what we happened to come across reading the research on our own. I'm hoping to use it to trim down what we're doing and cut the cost of the supplements. 

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    • Dan That would be great, looking forward to getting this new program. In the meantime, where can I find a list of those anti-aging supplements you guys are  taking already?

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Jennifer Klein I have a post somewhere detailing but I can't seem to find it. Anyhow the core is NAD, ALA/ALC, Phosphatidylcholine, CoQ10 (Ubiqinol), Quercetin and Resveratrol (enhanced by having taken a NAD regime). Those are the core ones, we take a  amino acids to fill in since we're vegan (creatine and another), the rest is mainly plant derivatives. 

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    • Dan Thanks Dan, many of the  supplements/adjuvants that you mentioned are included in the Kaufmann Protocol.  Amino acids -as Leucine- are included too to prevent sarcopenia in the case of taking Metformin. Looking forward to  your feedback once you read the book.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Jennifer Klein OK! Thanks for the encouragement, I've been meaning to get around to it and just got the Kindle version. Perusing it this is fantastic, I'm a engineer (nee scientist) so appreciate her digging into the details. 

       

      For the ALA/ALC look up Bruce Ames who created the Ames test, which is what is used to detect the effect of (e.g. carcinogenic) compounds on it. There's several videos of him showing the research, this one isn't great but anyhow the point is that the combination of ALA and ALC restores mitochondrial energy production to youthful levels in mice, but fixing the CoQ10/etc production mechanism. 

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    • Dan Thanks Dan for the video, I will look up more videos and do more reading  about the ALA/ALC combination.

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      • Danmoderator
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      Jennifer Klein Yes specifically the two together address mitochondrial disfunction, ALC by itself only addresses part of that problem. One thing to note is you need to have sufficient biotin in your diet or supplementation, they found some people with low biotin could suffer from skin flushing. 

      Otherwise I've done a scan of her book. Excellent work, not as expansive as I expected - I had thought she'd cover more supplements, but she certainly has all the big guns in there. On effects I've talked about I do notice a drop in 'pep' when I go off of them. (Pure anecdotal hand waving) - it could be placebo but I don't think so, it appears to be that without the supplements my general pep goes down, presumably from the mitochondria not functioning as well. Example of this was a period were I simply forgot to take my supplements and didn't notice, but I did notice a drop in energy and focus. Resuming fixed it and my energy came back.  

      In terms of this the ones that make the biggest difference, that I notice, is ALA/ALC, CoQ10 and PtC. 

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    • Dan There are so many anti-aging supplements and adjuvant out there that one is confused and at loss about what to take.  So when I came across this protocol that addresses all aspects of aging,  I found in it a perfect guide to what to take.   I hear that the doctor is expanding the protocol and up to now there are over 30 molecular agents targeting all the different cellular damage caused by time. There will  even be more that she is still working on. So for now I will stick to this list and to date,  other than noticeable general improvement (specially energy-wise) I have nothing negative to say about it (other than the inconvenience of too many pills to pop.  All the same I appreciate your comments about ALC, CoQ10 and PTC that are not included in the Protocol ... so far.

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    • Dan Thanks for reading the book! The list in the book is only 15 of the Agents. There are 30 on the website, KaufmannProtocol.com, and I am constantly working to expand the list.

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  • Hello, I have been doing the Kaufmann protocol "panacea" for a few months now and one result has been to rid myself of inflammation in my right shoulder, that I  had for years. I corresponded with Dr. Kaufmann already, and she suggested adding  EGCg (green tea extract) to the protocol which I have done. I do not know if there will be many noticeable effects in the near future, but just the idea that it will be possible to outlive my expected expiration date is a huge turn on for me!  It is hard for me to remember to take all the capsules in a day so I put all the days ration in one little vial that I carry around with me. A challenge is travelling and taking the immortality supplements along. It can be quite an ambitious task explaining to customs agents that all the 200 colored capsules you are carrying are just your one week ration for age reversal!

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    • Edward Sutherland I know exactly what you're  talking about with so many pills to take and carry around when not home. I also have that good feeling of doing something  to prevent the degeneration that comes with age and not just stand still arms folded.  My knee pain is still there but with less intensity and I am hopeful it will eventually disappear altogether. I do take all the anti-inflammatory agents on the protocol.  Sometimes I worry whether all those pills are bad for the liver and the kidney. I will soon have some blood tests done and I really hope to see some good results.

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    • Edward Sutherland I realize that the plethora of capsules is a pain in the butt! I just ordered the most awesome containers for folks that want to be organized and/or travel a lot to make life a little easier for everyone. I'll post a pic when they arrive. 

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    • sandra kaufmann  Great idea, maybe it would be possible to put on a sticker like "Notice, contains anti-aging food supplements for personal use only"  to soothe customs agents !!

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    •   sandra kaufmann That is a great idea indeed and I hope there will be for  international shipping as well.

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    • Edward Sutherland You can temporally come off some of the pills when travelling - it's even recommended such as with Carnosine - and only take the basics  "Panacea. This doesn't work of course if you travel most of the time and in this case good luck with the customs agents.

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    • Edward Sutherland excellent idea!

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  • Jennifer Klein

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    • Jennifer Klein  Yes, the possible side effects and the interaction of the different molecules are a source of concern for me also. Since the supplements I am taking are getting stronger and more potent over time I watch what I take and when. I would never take a high potence Curcumin on an empty stomach for example. Not only liver and kidney, but the whole intestinal tract can be influenced. If I get a bad stomach upset then I take nothing that day anymore for a precaution. The problem now is still that the thresholds for efficacy of many age reversal products are not yet known, so different companies recommend starkly differing dosages !

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    • Edward Sutherland Indeed,  it is a bit of a gambling game we are playing here, still I believe it is better than sitting back and do nothing.  Both my parents had bad old age with an array of many degenerative diseases. They did have the healthy Mediterranean diet and were quite active, but it still caught up with them.  So just a healthy lifestyle is not enough...  Of course there maybe interactions and side effects with all those molecular pills... we  should each do our homework and research and maybe also help each other with remarks and feedback.

      Curcumin should be taken with meals, its best absorbed with  fatty food, also with black pepper I read.  Me, the green tea extract on an empty stomach upsets it, yet it should be taken that way, so it is then up to me to decide.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Edward Sutherland If there's bad interactions between supplements then you might as well ask why there aren't the same between all the different parts of food. Eat an Indian dish, I make one and count some 20 ingredients, 1/4 of which are spices. It's vegan, so these are all plants with hundreds of different molecules in each. Plus we add other vegetable sides. A handful of supplements is swamped by the variety of molecules we get from a varied diet. 

       

      On supplements, FWIW I'm a decent exerciser, but only do 4 miles a week on the track and the rest of the week 1/2 hour on a stationary bike, plus some Pilates. Yet I run with a buddy who has been doing it his whole life and was competitive, plus daily swimming and biking. Interestingly I'm the one carrying the conversation, he can't run and talk but I can, even though he's the super athlete compared to me. What's different is I'm careful about what I eat and do a lot of supplements/NAD/Metformin and so on. Anecdotal, but I've found that yes it does have impact, as long as you are checking all over your other boxes (diet, exercise, sleep, relationships, creative work, etc). 

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    • Jennifer Klein 

       

      Hi!

       

      I have also experienced an upset stomach when I took Green tea extracts (EGCG mega extract) on empty stomach.  I could reduce the discomfort in a few ways.

       

      -          Take the extract after a cup of real green tea.

       

      -          Take the extract with quercetin. (I only use the Quercetin Phytosome).

       

      -          Do not use extract at all but try to increase absorption from real green tea in a             radical way and drink a fair amount of green tea and:

       

      Drink real green tea on empty stomach and together with a small amount of vitamin C and piperine/black pepper and quercetin.

      + Let the tea water reach boiling before you pour it into the teacup.

      + Let the tea leaves spend a long time with the tealeaves.

      As far as I have read these are measures to draw more catechins out of the tea leaves and to get a better absorption from real green tea.  Otherwise, when it only comes to prepare a good cup of tea, they don't recommend that green tea should be prepared by using boiling water and they usually recommend that the tea leaves only to be a short time with the leaves. But the longer time and the higher the temperature the more of the healthy substances will come into the tea.  

       

      Vitamin C, piperine and quercetin seems to increase the absorption of real green tea. And therefore it is easier to get a meaningful amount of EGCG and other catechins from drinking green tea. I would like to mention that some time ago I wanted to try green tea extracts again.

       

      Then I took the extract with quercetin phytosome and also this time It did not upset my stomach. it is also anecdotal but these are my personal experiences and also based on the information I have been able to find. 

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Staffan Olsson Not surprised about the stomach upset - green tea in its native form is known to give people upset stomachs, never mind concentrating it. There's a chemical in there that a significant portion of the population is sensitive to, I forget the name of it. You can get used to it, when I first started drinking green tea decades ago after discovering it in Japan I could get a bit of a stomach upset, but that disappeared eventually. Don't know if that's possible with a pill - my answer would be to just drink it straight. 

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    • Staffan Olsson Thank you for your tip, also thank you Dan.  Green tea contain tannin which is a beneficial antioxidant but does irritate the stomach. I had to try many brands until I found one that doesn't upset my stomach. I try to take  green tea in both  forms, the extract in pills and the brewed leaves and yes I make sure it is strongly brewed even if it gets bitter and upsets the stomach more. It's very true that you get used to it after some time and the discomfort is minimum.  Sometimes I eat a piece of fruit first then the tea, and it works,  and if you say that vitamin C helps with the absorption then even better.

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    • Dan 

      Thanks Dan. I did not know that there is a specific substance in green tea that can effect stomach in that way. I can have gotten used to it.

       

      I drink plenty of green tea and quite strong.  And usually I take some c-vitamins with green tea - first thing in the morning. Lately I add quercetin to reap the potential synergies with Q. Then some time ago I also tried to add double dose of mega green tea extract to the tea. And that combination did not affect my stomach at all. But when I first tried strong green tea extract (EGCG) I felt really nauseated. Maybe I have gotten used to green tea, as you say is possible.

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    • Edward Sutherland To answer some of these questions, I never or rarely suggest taking the manufactures recommendations in terms of several capsules of anything a day. I think a slower, more constant infusion of the agents allows for an improved risk/ benefit ratio.

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  • This is Dr. Kaufmann of the Kaufmann Protocol. I would love to hear feedback about anyones experience so that I can tweak the system to make it even better! I am continuously looking at new agents ( it takes a while per agent) and will be posting up too date info on the website. KaufmannProtocol.com

    I regret that folks are struggling with so many pills, but at the moment there are no other options- But I'm in the same boat, and I'm working on a solution! 

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    • sandra kaufmann 

      So great to have you in the forum Dr. Sandra.

      Talking about the possible interaction of the different molecular agents, are there any supplements/adjuvants in the protocol that should not be taken together as they may cancel each other's benefit?

      As for the relative inconvenience of taking so many pills, I still prefer that to the pricy, unaffordable unpractical methods like NAD infusion, Stem cell therapy, or young blood transfusion.

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    • Jennifer Klein 

      Things don't exactly cancel each other out, but if you are going to take several anti-oxidants, I would spread them out over the day. The half lives of these are usually in the 4 to 8 hour mark, so that by late afternoon/evening you still have some coverage. 

       

      And I agree, the cost of the other treatments is a bit ridiculous at the moment! 

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      sandra kaufmann great to see you here, thanks for joining. 

      On the ALA I'm glad to see it in your protocol, but are you aware of Dr Bruce Ames (nee Ames Test) work on this and ALC? His research is published and there are also videos on YouTube (linked below) where he gives a talk on this. The point being is that he found while ALA addresses some part of mitochondrial aging, if you combine it with ALC (Acetyl-L-Carnetine) you'd address the rest of it. The two were necessary, and in mouse models he was able to get old mice to nearly as well as young with these two together. 

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      • ChrisR
      • ChrisR
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       sandra kaufmann I started the PANACEA one month ago. I'm 59, I'm a lean endurance runner and free thinker, I feel better in both area. More endurance and I'm sharper. I also can sleep less... but I wonder if it is really a good news? Also I had a Seborrheic Keratosis on my head, doctor told it was not here to dessapear, but it did (Could it be the Astaxanthin?). 

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  • Excellent questions! Your body is going to naturally titrate the amount of sleep that you require. If your cells are becoming optimized and getting what they require with less sleep, then great! In general however, most older folks get too little sleep stemming from a sirtuin deficiency which then gets reversed on the protocol and they can finally sleep. In terms of the keratosis, it has components of an inflammatory nature, so both the astaxanthin and the curcumin should help. 

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      sandra kaufmann This is great to hear. I'm having sleep issues at the moment - typical mid life stuff  and probably also aging itself. For focusing on sleep specifically what supplements would you recommend? 

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    • Dan You need to boost your sirtuins with either pterostilbene or resveratrol, and then make sure you are getting enough NAD replacement. 

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    • sandra kaufmann 

      I have had sleep issues as well, now I sleep like a baby.  I do take both Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, then I take NAD and  Melatonin every night,  all within your recommended dosing. It works like a charm but I hope I am not overdoing it.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      sandra kaufmann Got all that covered thanks, fortunately it's doing much better, was other issues ... Another good one for sleep is 5-HTP, a serotonin precursor, before bed, and a magnesium to help relax the muscles. 

      By the way, FWIW your suggested melatonin doses give me a 'melatonin hangover'. I tried them long before reading your book, they're common recommendations and most of the supplements come in these sizes, but they're like sledgehammers. They put me down so deep I don't dream and probably don't get any REM. I use the 300 microgram time release from LE which is pretty perfect, and even at that I'll drop it for a few days every other week or so. 

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    • Dan I see that every person is a world and reacts differently to medicine/supplements/adjuvants.  Me Melatonin gives me way to many dreams... sometimes I have a feeling I have been dreaming the whole night. So at times I get worried that I am getting too much of the REM Sleep and too little of the deep sleep.

      I take 4 mg each night and for almost a year now.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Jennifer Klein Exactly - yeah I can't even imagine 4 mg! I've always been a great sleeper so maybe produce a lot of melatonin already.

      Reminds me of another one for sleep which is Glycine, an amino acid I believe. Hibernating bears have loads of it in their brains. Take it before you sleep and you'll have great dreams. 

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    • Dan 

      I like to mention that I get a good night’s sleep from 300-400 mg standard folic acid that is taken before I lay down in bed. I take it alone or with different kinds of magnesium. But no effect from magnesium threonat, which does not not improve my sleep.

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      • Danmoderator
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      Staffan Olsson magnesium is just a muscle relaxant I believe, similar to taking an epsom salt bath. I don't find it a huge effect but it does seem to help. 

      Speaking of which since we've veered into talking about sleep, I've found relaxation exercises to work wonders. I use the Muse EEG headset and their meditation programs to relax the body and calm the mind an hour or two before bed. Really does wonders. 

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    • Dan 

      Men in general sleep better than women, maybe it's the testosterone. Your endogenous production of Melatonin must still be good. I know I don't have much left .  I do prefer Melatonin to all the other sleep aids because  I also want to get the anti-aging benefits it has,  the dosing of which  (in the protocol) starts at 3 mg. 

      Here is an anecdote for you:  I went to my doctor a few years ago to get some help for my sleep problems and she told me that I could take Melatonin  up to 30 mg/night that  she  herself was taking with no problem. She prescribed 10 mg for me to start with (have been taking smaller doses before) and build up to higher doses but my body didn't like it so I stopped. So my happy medium now after trial and error is the 4 mg. 

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Jennifer Klein Good info thanks. My wife's hormones crashed a bit ago in her 50's and she wasn't sleeping. Her doctors told her that Progresterone promotes good sleep. Once she was on that and estrogen it cleared up, and she also uses the 300 mcg that I use. 

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    • Jennifer Klein Awesome!!! It takes about a month for the SIRTUINS and NAD to kick in to improve the circadian rhythms. And no, you are not overdoing it!

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  • I have been on the panacea since November, but kicked it into high gear in January with the addition of  most of the tier two suggested supplements/adjuncts on the Kaufmann app.  I have never felt,looked, or performed better.  Dr Kaufmann does not link anti-aging with athletic performance, but I am proof positive that her protocol is making a huge difference for my cycling endeavors.  If anyone follows "strava" you can see that I have claimed 'KOM" (king of the mountain..fastest times) on many routes since January.  I know Dr Kaufmann has developed the NFL playbook (patent pending) for athletes, but look at the additional supplements and most of them are part of the playbook (spoiler alert, sorry Dr K)!!

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      charles smith I've also noticed athletic differences. Been running/cycling for decades but nothing special, 30min on an exercise bike and a 4 mile run on the weekend. However my VO2max is 50 - equivalent of a college athlete. I'm 53! During a run I can carry a conversation. I can only attribute this to the healthy living and supplementation. 

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      • charles smith
      • Anesthesiologist in Texas
      • charles_smith
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      Dan I feel ya!  However, as you mention, and as Dr Kaufmann notes repeatedly in her book, the supplementation and antiaging protocol is not about diet and exercise, but I feel a lifestyle of consistent exercise and moderation in diets, gives you amazing results.  I just wish I had read Dr k's book a decade ago!!  As with everything in life, I believe consistency is the key ( along with the protocol, of course)

       

      You Go College Man !!

       

      Charles

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      • Larry
      • Larry.1
      • 1 mth ago
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      charles smith I can't find you on Strava. Do you use your own name? 

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      • charles smith
      • Anesthesiologist in Texas
      • charles_smith
      • 1 mth ago
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      Larry 

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      • charles smith
      • Anesthesiologist in Texas
      • charles_smith
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      Larry There are a billion Charles Smiths!! Try Charles smith san Antonio, that should narrow it down.!

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  • I haven't finished reading in depth but it appears the Kaufman protocol focuses on supplements that have broad spectrum effects on the aging process itself, as broken down into the seven categories she identifies. Really excellent resource on the 'best bang for your buck' with supplementation. 

    In addition to that I'd add another grouping which are targeted ancillary supplements. Some of these might be broad spectrum enough to be included in the protocol. Examples

    • Phosphatidylcholine (cell wall lipid that we lose with age)
    • Phosphatidylserine (nerve/brain)
    • Milk Thistle (Liver health)
    • Saw Palmetto (Prostate health)
    • Lutein (Eye health)
    • Argenine (blood vessel health)

    Finally there are supplements which are for general purpose health. I call this 'insurance' 

    • Multivitamin 
    • Ubiquonol (a little boost to aging folks has general benefits)
    • D3 (goes without saying)
    • Fish Oil/Essential fatty acids
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    • Dan There are definitely things we should be on that do not necessarily help you stop aging, but help with overall health. The list above looks pretty good- But I would add Leucine, Collagen, hyaluronic acid and a general vitamin.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      sandra kaufmann et. al.

      Followup, in David Sinclair's new book he discusses how certain Amino Acids - prevalent in animal foods, promote the aging process via mTOR (c.f. p99*). Current thinking is that it's nutrient sensing that tells our system whether times are good (lots of food = time to breed and grow) or bad (not much food = time to repair and wait it out). Specifically (pp 100-101) 

      There's a lot of methionine in beef, lamb, poultry, pork, and eggs, whereas plant proteins, in general, tend to contain low levels of that minor acid - enough to keep the lights on, as it were, but not enough to let biological complacency set in. 

      The same is true for arginine and the three branched-chain amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, all of which can activate mTOR. Low levels of these amino acids correlate with increased lifespan ...

      Now of course research is always evolving and it's difficult to know the right approach in the early days. However, FWIW personally I started my age reversal program in the 80's and back then all we suspected was "eat plants and exercise" - based on the early data we had back then (I've been a vegan since and have documented my biological age and measurements around the forum). Now we know much more, including the mechanisms by which animal foods, via specific amino acids, turn off the rejuvenation processes. Personally I'm scratching the amino acids off the list

       

      *

      When we substitute animal protein with more plant protein, studies have shown, all-cause mortality falls significantly

      PS - great points Sandra - yes I have a number of other additions not mentioned including a multi

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    • Dan Sounds good but how to address or avoid age-related muscle loss which is a natural part of aging. After age 30, we lose as much as 3% to 5% per decade. The more sedentary lifestyle we lead the more muscle loss of course.  Less muscle means greater weakness and less mobility. Our diet plays a role in building muscle mass. Protein is the king of muscle food, the body breaks it down into amino acids to build muscle. By removing animal protein and amino acid supplementation how to renew or how to make up for that muscle loss? Is plant protein good enough? I am a modified vegetarian myself, allowing fish and seafood now and then. I don't want to live long if my body is weak and frail.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Jennifer Klein muscles don’t build simply from eating aminos. Search for Frank Medrano for an example of what you can do on a vegan diet (low aminos). Testosterone builds muscles with lifting and is the only way we know how to AFAIK

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RFPsvF3UOdo

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    • Dan There is always a tradeoff with aging. In the case of amino acids, the trade off boils down to the mTOR pathway. Clearly AA's activate the pathway, which is the opposite of anti-aging. However, the direct negative outcome is sarcopenia and increased fragility. Personally, I use only the BCAA's and none of the other amino acids in an attempt to not lose muscle mass ( I'm a rock climber and I need it!). At the same time, I take metformin, which is a partial mTOR inhibitor. 

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    • Dan Thanks Dan, but this is bad news for women, I don't think I have much Testosterone (and hope not).  Moderate amount of animal protein and the branched chain amino acids is the compromise I will have to keep then.

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      • Danmoderator
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      • dantheman
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      Jennifer Klein 

      Yeah it's tricky! And I'm certainly not an expert in this topic. However women certainly do have testosterone, just not as much as men obviously. But having a little is important for your health and well being. Just as having a little estrogen gives men benefits too and is important. At any rate the topic is also near and dear to my heart as my wife is at an age where she is feeling like she is slowly losing muscle mass. FWIW we're working on her hormones, including testosterone, and exercise, both of which appear to help. I'll look more deeply into branch chain amino's also. 

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    • sandra kaufmann 

      Hello Dr Kaufmann!

      When it comes to fighting sarcopenia I wonder if you have given creatine a thought as a substance with for being a potential substitute for leucine and HMB. (And with possibly less mTOR activation).

       

      It is a well-studied substance and besides showing potential for addressing issues with sarcopenia the safety profile is quite appealing. And it has a long track record of being used in high doses by athletes during long periods of time with few or none side effects. At the beginning of its hype it was mostly used for exercise performance and muscle strength but now geriatric research is focusing on the ability of creatine to inhibit or slow down neurodegeneration, to reduce lipofuscin accumulation, to strengthening the heart (addressing congested heart failure) and for blood sugar control. Quite a lot of research has been done on rats and mice. But the evidence is mounting when it comes to its usefulness for increasing energy, strength as well as being a neuroprotector and heart protector.

       

      I am considering of adding creatine as a more permanent substance. So far I have used it a for 3-4 weeks a couple of times a year. Now I consider reversing this cycle and to use creatine more permanently but with 3-4 of weeks off a couple of times a year.

       

      Right now I have started a period of being “on” creatine and it gives me very nice feelgood effect with heightened energy and increased strength.

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  • In Lifespan: Why We Age―and Why We Don't Have To by David Sinclair, at the beginning he discusses a history of aging research, in particular how we know that the anti-oxidant theory of aging, while hugely persistent, simply isn't correct. Much research has shown that reducing oxidative load on an organism does not increase lifespan (see the book for details). However of note that it isn't a bad thing! For example, clearly going out in the sun and burning yourself every day isn't a good idea. But conversely loading up on antioxidants, while it has ancillary benefits, won't help you live longer. 

    sandra kaufmann mentions Antioxidation properties of supplements in the book, but I'm not clear on how large a role that plays in the protocol. Sinclair's Information Theory of aging relies on gene's and gene expression, which is also part of the Kaufman Protocol. At any rate it's worth considering the relative worth of anti oxidative properties of supplements given the current state of knowledge. 

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    • Dan Whereas getting rid of all of the free radicals is not a great idea, as they do serve a useful purpose, evidence is very clear that as we age, our own endogenous systems fails and we suffer from the consequences of free radicals. It is also important to note that we age for many reasons (ie 7 categories) and this is just part of one. 

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  • Just gearing up for the KP. This is the most rational nutraceutical program I have ever read. I am an anti aging physician. I would love to hear the group's opinion on good sources for NAD, astaxanthin,  and carnosine. Also, is there a difference between NMN, and NR . Sinclair says NMN better but does not mention a source. Great forum topic

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    • Ira GoodmanIra MD 

      For  Astaxanthin I take the BioAstin Hawaiian one, 8mg daily as I exercise a good deal.  I even noticed a nice soft tan happening naturally after a few months of use.

      NMN is hard to get so I take NAD from LifeEXtension.

      Carnosine is easy, either Source Naturals, Now Supplements or Life Extension.

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    • Ira GoodmanIra MD I appreciate the vote of confidence! I tried to make this a very consideration and reasonable approach. There will always be outliers, but I have tried to make it as user friendly and scientific as possible. 

      You can either get the NAD from NR or NMN- I really don't think it makes a difference. The best astaxanthin I believe is bioastin; its from an algae in Hawaii. Meanwhile, I don't think it matters on the Carnosine as it is a basic dipeptide.  

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  • Thanks for the email. I may be at raadfest. I have revised my complex nutraceutical intake as a result of your work. Will keep you posted. Ira

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  • Stop by my booth and say hi!!!

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  •  

    To organize information on these topics, I'm keeping a spreadsheet. (Its huge).   Dr. Kaufmann's protocol fits smoothly into that format.  Sorting on the sum of 7 factors ( "∑" ) shows me where to focus my attention.  Above is my first pass at doing this.   (Partial screen shot to show the concept.)

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    • Mike Almerjanski I think that is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen!!!!

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  • I've been on much of it for the past year but have been doing so many things w/ all the new info there's no way to tell if any benefit although overall I'm going in the right direction, but w/ Metformin, 1 meal/d, etc. that likely have a stronger effect, and now trying more Zn, DHEA and GHG secretagogues per Dr. Fahy's paper w/ 9 subjects showing -2.5 yrs. epigenetic age in 1 yr.! At 75 I think my hair may have stopped greying and nothing is getting worse! Just ordered more C60 after reading Ryker Black's "Underground Life Extension Handbook..."

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  • Dr. Kaufmann graciously agreed to join our advisory board at QALYTUDE. And we are really excited about an opportunity to make the prescription components of Kaufmann Protocol available to KP followers on QALYTUDE.com

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    • Anar Isman will you notify when this is available?

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      • Anar Isman
      • Anar_Isman
      • 13 days ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Kelly Parmenter-Eck Hi it is available our service is functional. Please check out qalytude.com

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  • Just wondering how much, and when people doing the Panacea program from the Kaufmann protocol should take metformin, rapamycin and NAD patches, since they are not on the protocol. Can one stop NAD+ or NMN supplements using the patches?

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    • Edward Sutherland Thanks for asking! In addition to the Panacea, Metformin can be started any time. I was hesitant to tell folks to take it, as it was hard to get from most primary care physicians. That is now a non-issue with the help of Qalytude. The NAD patch can replace the NR or NMN; it doesn't really matter how one elects to replenish their NAD.  In terms of Rapamycin, I'm not a big fan. I believe there are some questionable side effects, so I am hesitant to recommend that for anyone. (you will hear many conflicting reports and opinions on this!) 

      Hope this helps-

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  • I've been on much of the Kurzweil/Kauffman/Sinclair/Gundry Protocols for a few years (less for Kauffman/Sinclair) and at age 76 I finally got some Sept. lab work plugged into the Levine spreadsheet the other day and got a Phenotypic age of 69 so not nearly as good as Dan or Mike Lustgarten but I've had AFib for 40 yrs. and more years of bad habits (heart failure for ten) so hoping I can slow aging a bunch this next year and more the following and I'll be a very happy guy! On Metformin (2g/d) for a year and Rapamycin for 7-8 months and fisetin etc.

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  • I think you would benefit from a stronger senolytic therapy program- If you look on my website KaufmannProtocol.com under "About" and then "advance information", there is a paper on Senescence and senolytic therapy you might enjoy.

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  • I purchased the use of Dr. Kaufmann's My Protocol app recently with a six month payment.  I entered my information and it gave me a suggested protocol which I plan to implement.  What do I do for my wife?  I don't see a way to obtain a suggested protocol for a second family member.   Her health is much worse than mine - 67 year old with severe osteoporosis with her back falling apart with multiple compression fractures, one by one every few months.  She is taking many bone building supplements like BioSil, Ostera, Vit D3, K2, Strontium Citrate, Magnesium, etc but these aren't sufficient if she doesn't have enough osteoblasts working to build new bone that the osteoclasts are tearing down. 

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    • David Hanson 

      Actually you can use the App for as many persons as you like to get the recommended protocol. But only for one person if you want to follow up with the progress.

      So the following steps will enable you to get the suggested molecular agents for your wife, take a snapshot to keep then go back to yours:

       

      On the main page (where the dashboard is)  choose Regimen (top page right).

      Choose the commitment level you like (I would go for 150 points).

      Scroll the page all the way down to Edit Regimen and click.

      On that new page scroll down to Create Custom Regimen.

      Enter your wife's health information in the questionnaire.

      Proceed with the recommended Regimen.

      Take a snapshot or print.

      Go back to doing it all again for your own Regimen and keep it there to measure your own progress.

       

      I hope it helps and good luck for both.

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    • Jennifer Klein Thank you, for the information.

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  • My Kaufmann protocol according to the Kaufmann protocol IOS app.  My wife and I are in Thailand and Malaysia for a few more months so I can't buy most of these until we return to the USA.  I did start taking Metformin (over the counter here in Bangkok) and Astaxanthin.  The rest I have not found.

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    • David Hanson said:
      My wife and I are in Thailand and Malaysia for a few more months so I can't buy most of these until we return to the USA. 

       David Hanson -

      I'm Bangkok.  Perhaps I can offer some suggestions.  I'll make these general to benefit anyone in this corner of the world.  If you want to discuss details, we can use private messages or talk by phone.

       

      1. Amazon and iHerb deliver quickly.  Pay a little more for extra-fast shipping. 5-10 days.  But be careful of customs: anything over US$ 40.00 will be subject to duty and maybe to government inspection -- an aggravating waste of time.  Try to keep import orders under US$ 40.00 value per shipment.

       

      2. A website in Thailand -- Lazada.com -- will have some popular USA brands like NOW, Kirkland, and Doctor's Best in stock here in Thailand. Delivery 2-3 days. If you are near the dealer, delivery in 1-2 hours. Thais are slow on many things, but on deliveries they can be very fast.

       

      3. A few chemical companies here may have some Kaufmann protocol items.  If they do, then over-the-counter -- easy.  But they won't understand your English.  Best to show them a screen printout with names and chemical formulas of what you want.

       

      4. For buying items like these, pharmacies here are a waste of time.  And if they don't have what you want, they will try to sell you what they do have.  And they will lie about what is in it.  Best to avoid pharmacies.

       

      Questions welcome.

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  • David Hanson said:
    ... my wife  ... 67 year old with severe osteoporosis with her back falling apart

    As long as you are in Thailand now, have you considered Thai massage to help with that?

    I'm 76, get Thai massage 2-3 times per week.  Zero osteoporosis or any back problems.

    This thread is Kaufmann protocol, and I like to stay on topic.  So to discuss details, you are welcome to contact me privately.  Or start a separate thread on possible age-reversing benefits of therapeutic massage.

    Reply Like
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