Devil's Advocate

I have spent a few days reading through this forum and this website, and most of what I see are educated posts from intelligent well meaning people.

But, this is a field that is susceptible to scams, and there's very little info on this website to differentiate a legitimate company from 2 guys in their apartment in Florida.

Does anybody have good information on the Age Reversal Company to make it seem more legitimate?

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  • @Karl   I don't believe there is a "Age Reversal Company".  When you read the forums, you are reading the opinion of individuals not any company.  People are not waiting for Big Pharma and Big Medicine to do something about aging.  They are taking what information is available (some from animal studies only) and making decisions  on what to use.  Most of what is being discussed are supplements (which don't require FDA approval) and prescription drugs(rapamycin and metformin for example) which are repurposed for anti-aging.  There are doctors (including a Teledoc service) in the USA who will write prescriptions for these drugs or they can be purchased without a prescription overseas.   If you are young then you may want to wait for Big Pharma but my wife and I are 68 years old and we are not going to wait.

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      • Karl
      • Karl.1
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David Hanson I agree that Age-Reversal is not a big company, but they are some kind of business entity, and they ask for donations. The web site doesn’t give much of the usual “about us” info.

      I just got an email today from Bill Faloon asking for money for Age-Reversal. I’m yet to determine the motives of Mr Faloon. He’s written good books and clearly is advancing this field, but a google search shows him associated with “The Church of Perpetual Life” which pushes crionics.

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      • David H
      • David_Hanson
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Karl Mr. Faloon is more widely known as the founder and chief executive of a company named Life Extension, whose primary business is selling vitamins, supplements, and blood tests. Mr. Faloon is also a leader of the anti-aging movement.

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      • Karl
      • Karl.1
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David Hanson that there primary business is selling supplements is what should make you suspicious of what they put out. I would verify elsewhere any info you get from Life Extension. I do subscribe to their magazine.

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  • David Hanson said:
    we are not going to wait.

     ... I agree with  David Hanson about that.

     

    Karl said:

    But, this is a field that is susceptible to scams, and there's very little info on this website to differentiate a legitimate company from 2 guys in their apartment in Florida.

    ... Yes, indeed; susceptible to scams.  And not just scams, but also good intentions without expertise to back them up.  We already see on this forum several posters with "agendas": either to sell certain products or to promote their own "pet" ideas.  One example of that from Brenda Anderson .  Business is business wherever you can find it, but this is not a place for impartial information.

    ... I do a lot of Internet research about nutrition.  It has been surprising to me that "2 guys in their apartment in Florida" often offer more useful information than "legitimate" companies".  Finding those individuals is the challenge.  I actually bought search engine software to help me "tease out" those who know from those who pretend to know.  Experience shows me that individual opinions are far more likely to be useful than just about anything from "legitimate" companies.  And the bigger the company is, the more likely to be so.

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