Biological Age Test #4 in 2020: Getting Better or Getting Worse?

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  • Michael,

    Your analysis ignores the fact that some of the inputs to the Levine phenotypic age calculation have a much bigger impact than do others.  Here are the results of doing a 5% variation on each input:

    Creatinine and white blood cells are way down on the list.  You should focus on #2 and #3.

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  • I'm now looking at dietary correlations with RDW and MCV. Thanks for that input,  JGC!

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  • JGC I don't think age should be included in determining the weighting. it is a co-correlation factor. I removed it and my weighting looks different. Creatine is important.

     

    Btw - I greatly improved RDW and MCV with my regimen of rapamycin and one D&Q treatment.

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      • JGC
      • Retired Professor of Physics
      • JGC
      • 2 yrs ago
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      Paul Beauchemin 

      I have said before that I think including calendar age as a parameter in an estimate of phenotypic age is, in a way, cheating.  However, that's what Levine & Co did, so to replicate their calculations that's what I had to do.  The inclusion of calendar age insures that the phenotypic age is never very different from calendar age.

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  • Is there a better measurement tactic for effective age?   I'd like to test myself today so as to have a reference but what test/spreadsheet (that makes sense)?  tnx

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      • MAC
      • MAC
      • 2 yrs ago
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      Curtis Smith 

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      • MAC
      • MAC
      • 2 yrs ago
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      MAC I took a DNAge this past July. It uses the latest Horvath clock. 
       

      https://www.mydnage.com/

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    • MAC  $300 is a drop in the bucket on this path I agree and will do.  But is there another metric that I can do more frequently then annually?   Tnx for this tip!

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    • Curtis Smith Levine spreadsheet uses just bold tests to estimate.

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      • MAC
      • MAC
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      Curtis Smith more accurate? You want accuracy but low cost? There are other epigenetic clocks but Horvath is deemed the most accurate in humans. You should stick to one clock if you are going to establish a baseline and then assess the impact of changes. One thing I didn’t know was that exercise can actually increase DNAge, although it is a lifespan extender. Turns it the sites that are impacted are actually considered pro lifespan, even though they may methylate on the Horvath clock. 

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      • MAC
      • MAC
      • 2 yrs ago
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      Curtis Smith Yeah I agree given the importance of attaching true anti-aging significance to relatively potentially very expensive, time consuming, and often significantly lifestyle infringing interventions. I did the blood version, although they also have urine. Blood was more whole body scanning.

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