A different point of view

Interesting article that argues for telomere therapy and against senolytics.

https://www.leafscience.org/are-senolytics-potentially-damaging-for-longevity/

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  • Yes, I agree . These are opposing views. But this is how science move forward. Senolytics and elimination of senescent cells or rejuvenation through moving old cells into a more youthful state. “Dr. Fossel is a driving force behind the company Telocyte and has been the leader in proposing the use of telomerase to treat human disease for the past two decades”. It is natural that he, as an expert on telemorase therapy, push for his approach. At the same way as the mayo group push their own research forward.

     

    It brings my thoughts to parabiosis and the related research. Like the one that Conboy is doing. Like..

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4512838/

     

    “The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle declines with age. Previous studies suggest that this process can be reversed by exposure to young circulation, but systemic age-specific factors responsible for this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here we report that oxytocin- a hormone best known for its role in lactation, parturition, and social behaviors - is required for proper muscle tissue regeneration and homeostasis, and that plasma levels of oxytocin decline with age. Inhibition of oxytocin signaling in young animals reduces muscle regeneration, whereas systemic administration of oxytocin rapidly improves muscle regeneration by enhancing aged muscle stem cell activation/proliferation throughactivation of the MAPK/ERK signalling pathway. We further show that the genetic lack of oxytocin does not cause a developmental defect in muscle, but instead leads to premature sarcopenia. Considering that oxytocin is an FDA approved drug, this work reveals a potential novel and safe way to combat or prevent skeletal muscle aging.”

     

    Senolytics is not the only “holy” grail. Stem cells research and telemorase research look promising.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6675530/

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      • Karl
      • Karl.1
      • 4 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Staffan Olsson thanks for the response and information. I guess the key is what happens after you use senolytics? Do those cells get replaced? Do you need stem cell therapy to do that? And if Telomere therapy works, then senolytics aren’t needed.

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    • Karl
    • Karl.1
    • 4 yrs ago
    • Reported - view

    Seems like there should be a section on this forum dealing with Telomere therapy, and Telemorase activiation

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    • Karl yes right now we focus a lot of attention to senolytics, AMPK activationn NAD replacement. I guess that is because we have got resaech from those fields that seam rather easy to translate into therapies that increase human healthspan and/or lifespan. 

       

      But yes, research related to parabiosis and research in telomere-related fields could have their own sections here.  

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    • Karl I recently found this forum and am surprised no one seems to be interested in this.  It seems like telomere shortening puts a definite limit on a person's lifespan.  You can do all these other things to improve your health and reduce your chances of disease, but then you run out of time once your cells have divided about 50x and your telomeres have reached their limit.

      I just ordered some centella asiatica and will be experimenting with it.  It seems pretty safe and has been used for centuries in India and China.  The first paper I read was "Discovery of potent telomerase activators: Unfolding new therapeutic and anti-aging perspectives" by Dimitris Tsoukalas (2019), who also looked at astralagus, another traditional medicine.  Both activate telomerase which should repair and lengthen telomeres.  Isn't anyone else interested in this?  

      I've been reading about centella and can't find anything bad about it, such as increasing cancer risk, a topic that always seems to come up.  I have not yet determined the dosing regime but it doesn't seem to be needed all the time to do its job.  Maybe activate telomerase once a month?  I will be researching the dosage that's used to treat various medical conditions and probably copy that.  

      Another in vitro study was done by AH Karsono on a centella extract he made with ethanol.  The abstract is confusingly written with a double negative but he made similar findings, that it activates telomerase.  I don't see any reason to make centella more powerful and will just look at what the traditional medicine practitioners do.

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    • Paul D Wolf I tried to edit my post but apparently there is a time limit.  I found a few studies that showed that taking centella asiatica on a daily basis for a month or more can lead to reversible liver damage.  (Jorge)  There was a clinical trial using doses of 250, 500 and 750 mg per day that claimed 750 mg per day increased memory performance in the subjects.  That seems like a good range to start with, although not continually since it seems to build up in the liver.

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    • David C
    • David_C
    • 4 yrs ago
    • Reported - view

    The problem with his views is he seems to fail to take into account the stress and damage on stem cells from a SASP saturated environment. Not only that senescent cells push surrounding cells senescent. 

     

    This is means there are now more cell deaths that need to be replaced thus increasing the load on stem cells. We also have laboratory evidence confirming the beneficial effects is senolytics on lifespan on health.

     

    I feel this one scientist is just too vested in his particular field of rejuvenation.

    Like 2
    • JGC
    • Retired Professor of Physics
    • JGC
    • 2 yrs ago
    • Reported - view

    Fossel is indeed a fossil.  His telomere-as-a clock theory was hot in the 1990s.  Telomeres indeed get shorter with cell division, and when they get short enough, the cell becomes senescent.   Clearing senescent cells with senolytics gets rid of those, and there are many supplements, e.g. Epitalon, that support the production of telomerase and make your telomeres longer.  Steve Horvath has found that there is a very poor correlation between telomere length and aging.  Further, there's no easy and economical way to get your telomere length measured.  In my opinion, the best strategy is to take some Epitalon or equivalent, do senolytics every few months, and then don't worry about your telomere length.

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