Rapamycin and a possible link to accelerated Alzheimer's Disease

Just watched this video on YouTube that discusses a recent study which found that 5xFAD mice receiving rapamycin had increased Beta-amyloid plaque buildup in the brain. Thoughts anyone?

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    • Michael
    • Michael.1
    • 1 yr ago
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    Bummer

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    • Juan Daw
    • saxxnviolins
    • 1 yr ago
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    Amyloid theory of Alzheimer's seems to have been founded on doctored data.

     

    https://www.science.org/content/article/potential-fabrication-research-images-threatens-key-theory-alzheimers-disease

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      • Michael
      • Michael.1
      • 1 yr ago
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      Juan Daw Great article

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      • Karl
      • Karl.1
      • 1 yr ago
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      Juan Daw this is huge news that hasn’t been getting much attention.

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      • Marcus
      • Marcus_Asaro
      • 1 yr ago
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      Juan , your assertion is NOT true. Yes, it's huge news but for a reason most people don't know about. It, in no way affects the amyloid-β (aβ) hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), rather, it calls into question a particular type of aβ (namely, aβ*56) which was thought to be causally linked to AD. It turns out there are other types of aβ which can still be the culprit. In other words, it is news because too many people focused time and money on this fabricated aβ*56 connection instead of looking at other aβ oligomers. 

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      • Juan Daw
      • saxxnviolins
      • 1 yr ago
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      Marcus Asaro 

       

      I said "Amyloid theory of Alzheimer's seems to have been founded on doctored data."

      So was the data (images) doctored, or not?

      https://www.science.org/content/article/potential-fabrication-research-images-threatens-key-theory-alzheimers-disease

      "How an image sleuth uncovered possible tampering

      Vanderbilt University neuroscientist Matthew Schrag found apparently falsified images in papers by University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, neuroscientist Sylvain Lesné, including a 2006 paper in Nature co-authored with Karen Ashe and others. It linked an amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein, Aβ*56, to Alzheimer’s dementia."

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    • UB
    • U_Bednarzik
    • 1 yr ago
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    This is from Dr. Alan Green's https://rapamycintherapy.com/ :

    "Researchers used a mouse model of AD called 5XFAD. This model overproduces massive amounts of amyloid. The mouse has 5 defective genes from autosomal dominant familial AD. Rapamycin decreases the activity of the innate immune system which includes macrophages and microglia. Therefore, rapamycin naturally decreases the clearance of amyloid in this mouse model. Rapamycin is not good for this mouse. 

     

    99.9% of AD cases do not have these defective genes. 

     

    This 5XFAD mouse model is not applicable to most humans and in particular humans at increased risk due to being APOE4 carriers. 

     

    In my opinion, the finding in this study is only applicable to the 0.1% of AD cases that are familial autosomal dominant."

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