High quality, affordable rapamycin (and other anti-aging meds)

Hi everyone. Many of you might not realize it, but IAS has made rapamycin available without a prescription. It is the best price I've ever seen (better even than what I saw in pharmacies in Mumbai a couple months ago).

If you go to:

http://www.antiaging.clinic/

and enter the code "research" you will see the option of buying rapamycin, as well as a selegiline, metformin, and a few other anti-aging meds.

IAS has committed to putting a certain fraction of the revenue (15% I believe) into research.

Because of irritating legal/regulatory challenges, IAS cannot accept credit/debit cards, so you have to pay via wire transfer (e-check is an additional option if you have a bank in the US, probably also Canada). My purchase experience was smooth and quick.

And by the way I've been on rapamycin – 5 mg with a fatty meal (30% better absorption than on empty stomach) once a week – for nearly two months now. Feel fine. Haven't tested my cholesterol yet but the oft-noted side-effect of glucoregulatory dysfunction has not made an appearance. In point of fact, my fasting and postprandial glucose numbers have gone down a touch.

Brian

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  • Hi Brian,

    I too have been on Rapamycin and Metformin since June 2018. I got my Rapamycin and Metformin from Dr. Allan Green in New York.  I am retired and a full-time RV'er (motorhome) so I am able to travel to where doctors offices are in different states. My homebase is Florida.

    I too take my rapamycin with a fatty meal as since January 2018 I have been on a no-sugar Ketogenic diet (the Whole30 diet is very similar). It is now August 2018 and I have lost 65 lbs., feel great and my lab work has been coming back remarkable. Dr. Green is impressed with my insulin resistance too. I think sugar has a lot to do with aging, the recent obesity epidemic, heart disease, cancer and alzheimers (Alzheimers is now called Type lll diabetes!). 

    In my on-line research I found that the body can survive on either glucose or fat. When the body uses up the glucose it starts burning fat. If the body is burning glucose and creating insulin, it cannot burn fat at the same time.  This is why many people (including me) could not lose weight. I also found out that many cancers need glucose to survive. As I mentioned, regular cells can burn either glucose or fat for energy, BUT cancer can only burn glucose for energy and does not have the ablility to switch over to burning fat, thus the cancer dies.

     

    I now eat healty fats,  like coconut oil, olive oil, avacados and meats from grass fed cows and free range chickens, as the brain needs healthy fats to survive.  And I try not to overload on too much protein as that too can have an adverse effect. Best to fill you plate with healthy dark leafy greens.

    Reply Like 3
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 3 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird "cancer can only burn glucose for energy and does not have the ablility to switch over to burning fat, thus the cancer dies" Unfortunately it's not that simple, some cancers are able to adapt to ketone bodies - see the research of Dr Voltor Longo, there's a shorter version if you look for FoundMyFitness channel on YouTube which has a recent interview. They also talk about ketogenic diets and the evidence that they aren't living up to the hype. The best approach, if there is one, appears to be alternating a normal healthy diet (whole food vegan with the addition of fish if you desire) with water only fasting for the ketone benefits. Longo recommends this, 2x year fasts for athletes who eat right, 4x for healthy folks and more for others. 

      Reply Like 1
      • Snowbird
      • Snowbird
      • 3 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc  I also stated "many" cancers need glucose to survive, knowing that some cancers get around this. I still feel that the best approach is a no-sugar diet, although I'm sure the Food Industry has paid scientists to produce studies that disagree on this point. One scientist in England, I believe, recently wrote articles that "MCT oil is poison"! I have been on a no-sugar diet now since January 2018, lost around 65 lbs., feel great and my lab work shows I'm a lot healthier that I was. That's physical proof for me that I will live longer than I would have, if I had continued eating the way I use to.

      Reply Like 1
      • Snowbird
      • Snowbird
      • 3 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc Whole food vegan is difficult. The brain needs an ample amount of fats. Too many nuts causes high lectin and so does legumes. A raw, uncooked vegan diet is usually high in lectin, as boiling the vegetables decreases the amount of lectin that a person eats. A good book to read is "The Plant Paradox" by Stephen Gundry, M.D. where he explains that many plants adapted themselves for survival by producing toxic and bitter substances so that they would not be eaten. Now that I no longer have sugar cravings, I am leaning more towards a cooked vegan diet but I have to do more study on which foods will give me complete protein (but not too much) and healthy fats, on a daily basis.

      Reply Like 1
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 3 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird Been doing whole food vegan for 30 years, haven't found it hard. Numbers are perfect, biological age is calendar - 20, blah blah. Anyhow not trying to get in an argument, was just relaying Voltar Longo's work and the latest science research he discusses since he is big in the longevity community (he studied with Roy Walford), and that is what the board is about. Regardless if you're happy with what you're doing then stick with that. 

      Reply Like
    • Dan Mc Some can tolerate lectins better than others. I too stay away from them along with sugar, dairy, gluten, anything processed or poisoned. 

      Reply Like
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      immortality Great info! I've been on Rap/Met for a year and started fisetin (discussed elsewhere) a few weeks ago (74, 70kg., bad knees, foot pain 2 yrs. better after fisetin). I see that Dr. Green has added fisetin (senolytic/pain relief) to his protocol. Snowbird, has Dr. Green suggested something like the 1400 mg fis/d x 2 days that I ran across elsewhere or is he using different info? I've followed Dr. Gundry also but am using canned beans that have been pressure cooked which Dr. Gundry says does a pretty good job of neutralizing the lectins.

      Reply Like
      • Don
      • Don
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird I don't know why coconut oil has suddenly become a healthy fat. It's highly saturated. Or am I missing something?

      Reply Like
      • Snowbird
      • Snowbird
      • 1 mth ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Don  Hi Don, 

      Dr. Mark Hyman, the Medical Director at Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine, the Founder of The UltraWellness Center, and a ten-time #1 New York Times Bestselling can explain this better than I can:

      Why Saturated Fat Is Not the Enemy

      “Saturated fat has been demonized ever since Ancel Keys’s landmark ‘seven countries’ study in 1970,” writes Aseem Malhotra in a British Medical Journal review appropriately called “Saturated fat is not the major issue.”

      As Malhotra and numerous other researchers point out, correlation is not causation, and Keys neglected to account for many factors that could also contribute to heart disease. Keys cherry-picked his data, conveniently excluding whatever didn’t fit his hypothesis. In fact, the countries he studied that had the highest rates of heart disease also were the countries with the highest intakes of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Was it the fat or the sugar? Turns out it was the sugar!
      Even though critics pointed out these and other fallacies in Keys’s work, the public bought into the saturated-fat-is-harmful myth, avoiding it like the plague for decades and choosing instead inflammatory vegetable oils and trans fats in fake foods like margarine.

      The truth becomes much more complicated. Some fats do raise cholesterol, whereas others lower cholesterol. Even when saturated fat does, the type of cholesterol becomes more important than cholesterol itself. Saturated fat does raise the LDL or bad cholesterol, but it also raises the good or HDL cholesterol. But sugar lowers HDL cholesterol. And it is the ratio of total to LDL cholesterol that is a far more important predictor of heart attacks than LDL cholesterol itself.
      Quality becomes paramount here. The saturated fat in a fast-food bacon cheeseburger will have an entirely different effect than saturated fat in coconut oil.

      Let’s use grass-fed beef as an example. Although lower in saturated fat than grain-fed beef, roughly 40 to 50 percent of the fat in grass-fed beef is saturated.

      Compared with grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef contains more stearic acid, a saturated fat that doesn’t increase cholesterol. In fact, one study in the journal Lipid found stearic acid lowered LDL cholesterol.

      Grass-fed beef contains lower amounts of palmitic acid and myristic acid, two saturated fats that can potentially raise cholesterol.

      Interestingly, researchers find when folks consume more saturated fat—especially from healthy sources like coconut oil—their “good” HDL cholesterol increases and their “bad” LDL decreases. Saturated fat in foods like extra virgin coconut butter fuels your mitochondria, provides anti-inflammatory benefits, and could even improve your cholesterol numbers.

      (I am on a no-sugar diet, have coconut milk every day (love the taste and very hunger satisfying) and also put MCT Oil in my coffee. And my lab work verifies the researchers findings mentioned above!).

      Reply Like 1
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 1 mth ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird Yes, lot of docs swearing by coconut oil! I've been using it for over a year! Just swishing (oil pulling) w/ it can lessen or eliminate dental visits/cost (at least for me)!

      Reply Like 1
      • Don
      • Don
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird , Thanks for that detailed comment. Much to think about! 

      Reply Like
      • Iðunn
      • Iunn
      • 4 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird 

      1. Dr. Mark Hyman, the Medical Director at Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine, the Founder of The UltraWellness Center, and a ten-time #1 New York Times Bestselling Author, is a quack:

      https://www.salon.com/2009/03/12/mark_hyman/

      https://badsciencedebunked.com/2015/09/10/trick-or-tweet-dr-mark-hyman-exposed/

      https://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2010/10/05/mark-hyman-deceives-about-science-resear

      https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/tag/mark-hyman/

      2. It is a canard of denialists on the saturated fat-atherosclerosis connection to ramble on about the actual and purported problems with Keys' research, often plagiarizing journalist Gary Taubes since they haven't actually read his work:

      Fat in the Diet and Mortality from Heart Disease: A Plagiaristic Note | The Science of Nutrition

      ... and as if no research on the subject had been done since the 1960s on the subject. In fact, the case has continued to strengthen as subsequent research has filled in gaps and limitations of Keys' original work, and many of the supposed flaws in Keys' work only exist in Taubes' and his plagiarists' minds. For instance, the false claim about ignoring the association between sugar and CVD:

      Keys neglected to account for many factors that could also contribute to heart disease. Keys cherry-picked his data, conveniently excluding whatever didn’t fit his hypothesis. In fact, the countries he studied that had the highest rates of heart disease also were the countries with the highest intakes of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Was it the fat or the sugar? Turns out it was the sugar!

      Um, no.

      "However, as found in the analysis of the five-year follow-up data (Keys 1971), the correlation is accounted for by the inter-correlation of sucrose with saturated fatty acids in the diet. Partial correlation analysis showed that, with dietary saturated fat held constant, the correlation between dietary sucrose and the incidence of coronary heart disease is not significant (r=0.13). On the other hand, with sucrose held constant in the partial correlation analysis, the correlation of coronary incidence rate with the mean percentage of calories from saturated fat is r=0.62."

      Keys A, Aravanis C, Blackburn H, Buzina R, Djordjevic BS, Dontas AS, Fidanza F, Karvonen MJ, Kimura N,  Menotti A, Mohacek I, Nedeljkovic S, Puddu V, Punsar S, Taylor HL, Van Buchem FS. 1980. Seven countries. A multivariate analysis of death and coronary heart disease. Cambridge, MA; Harvard University Press.

      For more, Check out this WHITE PAPER from the True Health Initiative on the Seven Countries Study.

      I see you're on a zero-sugar diet; I think that's a great idea, at least as far as added sugars go. But you and everyone concerned about longevity should restrict their saturated fat intake too — something harder but not impossible to do on a ketogenic diet (if you really do eat keto — it's much easier if you're just whole-foods-low-carb).

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 8 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird Don  Coconut oil is very popular these days, let's examine what properties it has. First, the way your body reacts to dietary oil is that it gets no processing. Once in the GI tract it immediately gets dumped into your bloodstream, which causes a inflammation response from the endothelial lining. This is easy to test, just get a blood draw after an oily meal, and you'll have a test tube with a thick head of oil on it once it gets a chance to separate from the plasma. Also you can measure homocysteine which will elevate (not sure about WBC, but I would expect it goes up also). 

      Anyhow all your fat cells have special 'gateways' on your bloodstream that have a purpose; when they see free fat in the blood stream they pull it out and store. When the bloodstream is clear they take fat from the stores and meter it into the blood stream (based on caloric need signaling). So the fat goes unaltered from GI to your belly (and elsewhere). An interesting side effect of this is you can get a sample of fat from somebody and tell what they're eating. For example, eat pigs and you will have pig fat (the exact form) layered around your body. 

      Plant fats are different, because they are bound up with the lignin's and plant fibers, which takes work for your body to extract. So the fat, once freed later in the GI tract, slowly meters out into the blood stream without causing endothelial inflammation, and the actual caloric content is lower than free fat because of this work spent to get at it. Note that caloric content is simply measured at the FDA but burning the sample and measuring the heat released. 

      Now the form of the fat, saturated, unsaturated and so forth does have various minor effects on the blood stream, but compared to the macro effects these are not terribly significant. The research shows that it depends on the macro conditions of the person eating it - if they are unhealthy, free fat will make it worse. If they otherwise are healthy and live well, they can tolerate it better. For older folks who have depressed AMPK which leads to belly and organ fat I think free oil is doing them no favors. 

      FWIW, a short bit on dietary fat. Generally it can be observed that macro nutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fat) have macro effects, and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals and all the plant phytochemicals that we find in food, supplements and pharmaceuticals) have subtle, targeted effects. Are there significant micronutrients in coconut oil? Like all free fats the answer is the same - no, and unfortunately the biggest is iron which you don't really want. 

      Reply Like
      • Snowbird
      • Snowbird
      • 7 days ago
      • Reported - view

      DanMcL  When I read reports about how macro nutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fat) react in the body I also have to wonder what type of diet the person being tested is on. What does an "oily meal" consist of? MCT oil (medium chain tryglycerides) made from coconut oil goes directly to the mitochondria to be burned up as energy. That is if you don't mix carbohydrates with oil, as an insulin spike will stop the burning of fat!  High carbohydrate diets increase fat storage; "From the lips to the hips", and make fat stay in the bloodstream a lot longer. High carbohydrate is also responsible for increasing LDL, the particles that stick to the endothelial lining and accumulate as plaque. Fat is no longer the culprit in heart attacks, although there are many scientists (some paid by the food industry) that will disagree with this. Sugar is the real culprit but when it is mixed with fat it becomes even more dangerous. I would like to see new studies done on the bodies responses to dietary oil after a person has been on a no-sugar diet like ketogenics (non-grain meats, free range poultry and low glycemic organic vegetables.

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 7 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Snowbird 

      What does an "oily meal" consist of? 

      Free oil - any oil including coconut. It gets transported around the body via the blood stream. It's an easy test, my brother in law is a lab tech, he or any could demonstrate. 

      made from coconut oil goes directly to the mitochondria to be burned up as energy

      Citation? I found a paper studying phospholipid cell membrane effects from coconut oil, but nothing on coconut oil 'feeding' mitochondria, other than some promotional sites. Otherwise it doesn't make sense as the mitochondria produce cellar energy in the form of CoQ10 (by the kilogram for your entire body every day), they certainly don't 'feed' off oil. This is HS biology, that mitochondria work from glucose which come from carbohydrates, here's a quote

      Glucose and other carbohydrates made by plants during photosynthesis are broken down by the process of aerobic cellular respiration (requires oxygen) in the mitochondria of the cell. ... ATP is the energy-carrying molecule produced by the mitochondria through a series of chemical reactions.

      Simple carbohydrates spike insulin, but complex carbohydrates don't, the 'glycemic load' can be found for any common food. Anything below 50 is fine (nearly all natural plant foods). 

      High carbohydrate is also responsible for increasing LDL

      It's far more complex than that. To start study cholesterol particle size (large 'fluffy' versus small 'spikes'. You can get a test for this). Continuing deposits don't happen because of cholesterol, they occur because the site is prepared by endothelial lining irritation from poor lifestyle choices. 

      Sugar is the real culprit but when it is mixed with fat it becomes even more dangerous.

      Sugar is a problem, as is alcohol which is 'super sugar', but it's not because they're carbohydrates but simply refined ones. Again we get back to refining - concentrating, either in carbs, protein or fat (in the form of oil) is a good thing taken too far. 

      ketogenics

      Don't know. Ketogenic diets are all the fad now, a mistaken one unfortunately. The data is clear that our bodies run on glucose and benefit from short term ketosis, like a 3-4 day fast once a month to once every six months, depending on your health level (ref Dr Voltor Longo @ UCLA). Long term ketosis is not what our bodies were designed for. But it doesn't stop people from doing it. 

       

       Best,

      Reply Like
      • Snowbird
      • Snowbird
      • 5 days ago
      • Reported - view

      DanMcL 

       You had mentioned, “It’s easy to get a blood draw after an oily meal” which I now realize you meant that the subject eat only fats before the test. Again, since the subject may be accustomed
      to eating carbs, the body doesn’t automatically switch over to burning fat, which can give the impression that no fat is being burned. 

      I did not mention “coconut oil feeding mitochondria”. I mentioned Medium Chain Tryglycerides (MCT) going directly to the mitochondria for energy. But I also mentioned that having carbs with
      MCT oil, stops this process. I suggest you Google “MCT oil - Mitochondria” rather than coconut oil. Your post attacks all oils as bad. Olive Oil is touted as a healthy oil. I agree that “Man does not live on oil alone”. I also feel there is a lot of people, especially in the U.S., and other countries eating the Western diet could benifit from trying a ketogenic diet (not the old Atkins)
      for at least a short time. Walking past the grocery store’s pastries and the candy bars at the checkout will be difficult for a couple of weeks.

      I don’t advocate long term ketosis (elimination of all forms of glucose) either and nor does most people on a ketogenic diet. Once someone reaches his/her ideal weight, there is no need
      for ketosis and it is beneficial for someone’s health to include low glycemic organic vegetables
      so the body doesn’t just burn fat.

      You mentioned, “The data is clear and our bodies need glucose”. Our bodies can switch from burning glucose to burning fat. It takes a couple of weeks, sugar withdrawals, weight (fat) loss, and a heightened awareness. Fasting is good too, but many people that are addicted to carbs cannot fast to where is it helpful, or binge after.  Refined carbs, which the Food Industry puts in almost everything (baby food too!) light up the same parts of the brain as does cocaine. Many parts of High School textbook biology books are outdated as is the FDA food pyramid. 

      Rather that going round and round where you feel that a person only has to cut back on the food he or she is eating, and try to eat a balanced meal, I feel this has not worked for most people. Especially when consumers do not read the labels on the foods they are purchasing and how the for-profit Food Industry (watch the DVD “FED UP” does not care about our health. I suggest that you read, “Eat Fat, Get Thin” by Dr. Mark Hyman. He backs his information with “new” scientificstudies (footnotes to all the studies). 

      The body is a very complicated thing. We are ALL learning new information and what was thought as "Gospel" just yesterday can turn out to be different today. Also everyone has to be aware of how greed for money, wanting scientific recognition, and businesses that don't want consumers to changescan influence our food choices.

      Reply Like
  • Hi Brian,

    If anyone wants to get lab work without having to go to a physician, they can go on-line to www. health-tests-direct.com

      Dr. Green gave me this website address. You do have to pay for the lab work yourself, but a good thing is that they are affiliated with two lab draw companies that have facilities in every State in the U.S.  I like Quest labs and have used them twice.

    Reply Like 1
    • Snowbird Is there a certain test that is suggested to check aging markers 

      Reply Like
  • Hi Brian 

    Could you please tell me how to take rapamycin I know it should be 5mg per week but for how many weeks. 

    Thank you I appreciate the support. 

    Reply Like 2
  • Snowbird, thanks for sharing your experience. An amazing success story!

    Rawin, first, I need to stress that this is an experimental protocol. And I don't want to be offering medical advice illegally. But the idea promulgated by Dr. Green and other physicians and researchers is that one should take rapamycin permanently – assuming one doesn't have any serious side-effects. But it's always important to test biomarkers before and at various points after to make sure it's helping.

    Note that some researchers speculate that taking a break for a month or so every four to six months might not be a bad idea. But the truth is, no one knows. Our group is supporting research to try to get answers to the question of dosing. We should know more within a year or two.

    Brian

    Reply Like 3
  • Hi Braian and Rawin,

      I just wanted to add that Dr. Green did not just prescribe my Rapamycin and Metformin. He continues to follow my progress. He gave me a treatment plan where he requests specific lab work (Fasting Blood Sugar, Insulin, HgA1c, Chemestry Panel, Lipid Panel, CBC) for one month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year, that I e-mail to him to evaluate. He also recomments certain supplements and exercise. 

      I had looked into buying overseas rapamycin, but I wonder about the quality and also whether the U.S. Post Office would confiscate the drug before it reached me. Also I prefer having a professional physician that has been familiar with this rapamycin antiaging therapy ( he even uses it himself) rather than going it alone.  I like being able to correspond with him through e-mails (he responds back the same day!) should any adverse side-effects arrive.

    So far my lab work from www.health-tests-direct.com requested by Dr. Green has shown good improvements. Dr. Green is happy with the results so far, and I have joined a gym to maintain muscle as I lose weight.

    David

    Reply Like 2
  • David, just a quick reply about the overseas source I recommended: the company has been in business for many years, and the quality is excellent. Life Extension would not have agreed to work with them had that not been the case.

    And I have never heard of anyone in the US having a problem with shipments from them being intercepted.

    Reply Like
      • Snowbird
      • Snowbird
      • 3 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      BrianMDelaney  

      Hi Brian, Yes, IAS is a good company. I found them on-line about 10 years ago and have an account with them. I have ordered products in the past and have received them with no problem. Back then they put a paper in the box, just for the Post Office explaining that Americans have a legal right to small quantities of manufactured drugs for self use. The only problem I, and probably many others had at that time, was that U.S. credit card companies denied the transaction because it was an overseas order. IAS has since resolved the payment problem by asking customers to wire the money to them. I always worried about putting in a large expensive order and whether the Post Office would disregard the letter when they inspected the box and confiscate the drugs. I had no problems with my orders and I understand others have not had any problems. I think another good thing is that the plain-wrapped box comes from England rather than another country that would raise suspicion at the Post Office.

      Reply Like 2
    • I had to sign an NDA to view the COA – obviously, since it would contain propriety information. IAS sent it to me, and I can confirm that the rapamycin they sell (RapaPro) is produced in an EU country, and that it is high quality. I just ordered two more bottles. I think I'm going to up my dose to 6.25 mg (one and a quarter pills). The scale-up from the mouse studies suggests that as much as 10–12 mg might be optimal for age-reversal purposes. But scaling up to human-equivalent doses is of course an art as much as it is a science. If I get unpleasant side-effects, I'll go back down.

      Reply Like 1
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 7 days ago
      • Reported - view

      BrianMDelaney Good to know Brian, I may try upping mine also. Taking 6mg for most of the last 14 months hasn't had noticeable effects for me but my first two batches were from India (Rocas, 1 mg sirolimus, WindPharmacy). Last batch is the RapaPro (5mg).

      Reply Like
  • I don't think antiaging.clinic is part of or the same as IAS. Please correct me if I am wrong.

    Reply Like
  • Hi Brian and all,
    I just returned from RAADfest 2018, and have decided to start taking both rapamycin and metformin, both from IAS. I also am applying to participate in a "Low-T" clinical study here in Vegas in which I will apply Androgel daily to my upper arm. My participation in this study will not begin, and is not certain, until after my initial clinical interview early next week.
    Does anyone have any thoughts about interactions between these drugs, and about dosing regimes for them, especially rapamycin and metformin? My approach towards taking drugs and supplements, is to take the minimum amount necessary to achieve the desired effect, which in practice will mean taking an initial blood panel, and then ramping up my dosing, taking followup blood panels to objectively monitor my physiological state. I expect to use LEF's Aging blood test panel for this purpose. I just want to hear what others' experiences have been.
    Thank you,

    Mark Voelker

    Reply Like
      • Kerry
      • Kerry
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      MarkV I have already paid for a male panel blood test with Life Extension but am seriously thinking of cancelling this in favor of the LEG Aging blood test.  LEF is very easy to work  with on this.

      Reply Like
    • MarkV I would love to publish a story about your experience. Would you be interested? i can send you our guidelines. check out www.honeycolony.com .

      Reply Like
      • MarkV
      • MarkV
      • 3 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      immortality I joined your mailing list at 11:03pm PST November 13, so you have my email address. :)

      Reply Like
    • MarkV hello i do not have it. I dont keep track of all emails. But if you are interested in writing about your experience, we reach give million a month. It would help inform others. maryam@honeycolony.com . And thank you for joining our hive!

      Reply Like
  • I to attended RAADFEST this year. I think I finally found the IAS website that IAS mentioned at their RAADfest booth, I think it is here https://theantiaging.store

    I put in for rapamycin and metformin. I see they only take 2 payment options. Bank wire which I absolutely will not do and check2pay. I thought about doing the check2pay but I googled check2pay. It gives their website as https://check2pay.com . I clicked on and that website is gone. Shows it no longer exists. There has to be a better and easier way to get rapamycin and metformin. If IAS will not accept credit cards then they need to set up payment option with a trustworthy 3rd party vendor like paypal.com . Is there anyway some of the RAADFEST organizers could contact IAS and have them use at least paypal.com ?

    Does anyone else know how to get it these without going to a DR in the usa?

    Reply Like 1
      • MarkV
      • MarkV
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Viperml , it is not IAS that is keeping us from using credit cards, it is the FDA, which has imposed its will on the credit card companies through a financial verification firm called "Legit Script", which "verifies" the "trustworthiness" of financial transactions. Apparently, Legit Script keeps a list of prohibited firms that credit card companies cannot do business with, at the behest of the federal government. If Check2Pay has been taken down, your only other option is using a wire transfer, which is how I paid for my order of Rapa-Pro and Met-Pro. It cost me $50 wire transfer fee to get my $441 payment to IAS. That fee is constant, so it is best to place a large order.

      Welcome to "The Land of the Free(tm)".

      Reply Like 1
      • Viperml
      • Viperml
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      MarkV I understand that you may send a bank wire. That is something I will not do. To many risks. I will fly to New York first and speak with Dr green.

      Reply Like
      • MarkV
      • MarkV
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Viperml I don't understand the risk. People and companies routinely wire money around the world. There were no questions or eyebrows raised when I went to my local branch of Chase Bank to initiate the wire. What risks do you perceive?

      Reply Like
      • Viperml
      • Viperml
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      MarkV 

      There are many. This link lists the most common.

      https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-risks-of-international-money-transfers

      Reply Like
    • MarkV i'd like to add that my life was turned upside down for selling a liposomal high end CBD with Chinese herbs. The system/matrix considers these a threat. so now i offer e checks. 

      Reply Like
      • Kerry
      • Kerry
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Viperml No. The correct url is https://antiaging-systems.com/ Copy cats make it way more difficult than it should be. I have ordered from them for over 20 years. Its a good company.

      Reply Like
      • Viperml
      • Viperml
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Kerry 

      They had two links on the 15% raadfest discount cards they passed out at their booth. The link I posted above was listed on their discount card. IAS has multiple sites.

      Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      Viperml Correct Kerry we do.

      Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      MarkV You are 100% correct Mark, virtually no one outside of the USA can sell pharma products via mail order and offer credit cards now, it has all been pressure from legit-script.com and these 'guns for hire' are now going after prescription glasses online and asking folks to tell them is their nutritional supplier is making medical claims. This PRIVATE corporation is I understand funded to the tune of $5m a year by the FDA.

      Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      Viperml If you place www. into that address and you will find check2pay.com it is functioning perfectly well.

      Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      IAS Phil Please note that IAS has liaised with over 100 international bank and merchant sources, including  PayPal, Amazon, Apple Pay (please put another 90+ names into this list). They will not accept sales of pharmaceutical products. Meanwhile, IAS has all major credit cards for its nutritional products, but we (and everyone else online) cannot sell pharma related products via credit cards without risking massive fines for doing so, that is a policy change that was seeded in 2016.

      Reply Like 1
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • Reported - view

      Kerry Thank you Kerry for being such a long standing and loyal client. I helped form the organisation 27 years ago.

      Reply Like
    • IAS Phil I was wondering if you knew the time frame for product delivery from the Antiaging Clinic.  My wire transfer was received and my package was dispatched by them 7 days ago.  I chose the tracking option and it still indicates my package hasn't left it's destination.  Rather than worry needlessly I figured I would reach out to you.  Thanks in advance for your help. 

      Reply Like
      • RobH
      • RobH
      • 9 days ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Bailey's Girl International shipment typically takes about 2 weeks, maybe longer around holiday season.  I wouldn't get worried until a month - bothered perhaps, but not worried. 

      Tracking is another variable.  It's usually very good, but I've had packages arrive without having left...  Customs inspection can add a day or two on a random basis.  IAS seems to understand packaging better than some others as I've never had customs open an IAS package. 

      Worst I've experienced was a several hundred dollar shipment of cycloastragenol from China.  It's not even a drug, but tracking showed it reached San Francisco, and then returned to China.  My vendor reshipped the same package with the same documentation to the same address and it arrived OK.

      Reply Like 1
    • RobH 

      Reply Like
    • RobH ty so much for your reply.  I figured it was like this but it helps to know the experience of others.  I will be patient and hopeful. 

      Reply Like
  • I did end up getting the check2pay to work on their site.

    I ordered rapamycin and metformin from them. I chose general delivery. 

    I will let people know if i get it or not in around 2 weeks.

    Reply Like 1
  • HI I attended RAAD and i am an investigative journalist and fm coach. Is it possible to interview you Brian for a story i am writing? 

    Reply Like
    • immortality 

      First, apologies to everyone for the belated replies (here, and elsewhere on the forum). My email notifications were going into the wrong folder in my email program, and being marked as "read".

      First, immortality, yes, feel free to contact me about an interview. My email is my first name AT my full name with middle initial dot org.

      Reply Like
      • Kerry
      • Kerry
      • 1 mth ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      immortality Are you from Wired? Good luck with your story.

      Reply Like 1
    •  Kerry No i am not from wired. I am a functional medicine coach and an investigative journalist. I am best known for directing the film Vanishing of the Bees. I educate people on health and longevity and have been using myself as a guinea pig to understand the body and health for a long time.   BrianMDelaney  I will reach out again. ty. 

      Reply Like
    • Kerry thank you. I will keep you posted. 

      Reply Like
  • Mark, with both metformin and rapamycin, the dosing will be tricky. Also, note that both are likely to lower free testosterone a bit (an antiaging response that's part of a "famine" program that they set in motion to some degree). So being on those while in the study might be a problem.

    My experience with 6 mg / week rapamycin was that it didn't do squat. Scaling to humans from the mouse studies that showed benefit would mean taking between 15 or so and 95 or so mg. per day. I'm off rapamycin now but on my next experiment I'm going to try taking much more, but only – for safety reasons – for six or so weeks. Stay tuned.

    Reply Like 2
      • Kerry
      • Kerry
      • 1 mth ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      BrianMDelaney Nice to hear your take. After 10 months on 5 mg per week I have noticed a significant worsening of recovery time from exercise. Thought this a few months ago but it became more pronounced recently. Maybe this is a good thing and absolutely what one should expect.  Maybe cycling off after 4-6 months is advisable.  My bio markers stayed v good (a blood test monthly). What was your evaluation? How long did you take it? Any objective measures?

      Reply Like 1
    • Kerry I took it for about three months. My BP and fasting glucose were unchanged. I honestly think 5-6 mg (I started at 4, quickly went to 5, then 6.25, then 7.5 on last dose) is simply too low to have much of an effect.

      Reply Like 1
      • BobM
      • BobM
      • 2 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      BrianMDelaney 

      May we known how much metformin and what dosing rate were you using?

      What time of day?  

      With or without food?

      thank you!

      Reply Like 1
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 2 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      BobM Dr Dean recommends 1 gram a day for most folks. That's usually 500 mg 2x a day. Some folks may need more (like 500 mg 3x daily), but it's unusual to go higher (i.e. 2 grams) unless one is a type-2 diabetic. Metformin does inhibit B12 so make sure to supplement with that also.

      Reply Like 1
    • BobM I don't take metformin.

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 13 days ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

       BobM  I am starting with Metformin with a doctors prescription. I'm using the LE recommendations to mitigate any tolerance issues, start with 250mg/day, then 500mg/day, then 1000mg/day (two meals), then 1500mg/day. Bill suggests going to 850mg eventually, before each meal which is the maximum dosage. Standard dosage is 500mg before each meal. My doctor tried it but didn't continue because he felt horrible on it and wasn't willing to build tolerance. 

      Bill suggests it for anybody with fasting glucose above 85. I've got three genetics defects from my Veritas report (@BrianMDelaney) which correlate with higher fasting glucose (apparently not glucose intolerance but lower production), and despite my lifelong lifestyle work my numbers are in the 90's at best, so the Metformin is a good idea anyhow. 

      Reply Like 2
      • BobM
      • BobM
      • 13 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc 

      thanks for the detail Dan!

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 12 days ago
      • Reported - view

      BobM Also worth mentioning, Metformin can drive your testosterone lower, but if you follow LE and are older than 40 probably are doing replacement therapy anyhow. If not check LE for many articles on the subject and how to proceed (compounded pharmacy cream with blood monitoring to keep levels in range. 

      Reply Like
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 12 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc Ray Kurzweil (mid 70s, was diabetic) has said in a few of his videos that his doc has him on 3 g/d Metformin now so I've been trying the same since I am similar age/wt. and was pre-diabetic. Few problems so far even taking a gram at bedtime w/ just a little water (time-restricted eating) but read yesterday about AMPK boosting mechanism and am on LEF AMPK booster also, so may call them to see if there is an AMPK boosting limit (if anyone knows)? Will likely reduce one for a while.

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 12 days ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Dennis Fink Thanks, good to know. I watch every video of Ray's I find but missed that. 3g/day is a lot and according to Bill is above the maximum dosage (I believe this is the medical standard maximum) of 850mg x3 or 2550 (approx 2.5g), I wouldn't tell you what to do but since you were only pre-diabetic I wonder if that is warranted. There's a pattern I keep seeing with our biology is that ranging is important - we want things (e.g. exercise, macro/micro nutrients, supplements) in a range - not too much or too little. That is "more isn't usually better, and neither is little". Just a note this is not saying "everything in moderation". For example, with exercise the benefits come with moderate degree of exercise. Some people take this as "more is better" and become amateur athletes which opens you up to all sorts of issues. I work with lots of colleagues like this, people who have wrecked their bodies by over exercise (exercise induced asthma, hypertension induced from muscle work (heart has to work hard to pump through all those muscles), on and on). 

       

      Anyhow, something to think about. 

      Reply Like 1
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 12 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc Yes, I think I'll play it safe and stay below 2.5 g for the time being at least, especially since it is hard to evaluate all the other supplements that Ray and I are both on!

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 12 days ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Dennis Fink Good for you, I think that is wise. I also take a lot of supplements, approximately what Ray takes as it turns out as he details here. Question for you - do you also take Phosphatidylcholine (PC), and if so how much? This one puzzles me, Ray is a huge proponent but none of the 'lifers' such as Bill are as far as I know (though LE recently posted a research note about a study on exploring the relationship of lipids and cellar membranes here). Bill just looks at it for a source of choline for the brain (e.g. age related cognitive decline), but then notes that fixing choline depletion as occurs with aging isn't ideally solved by just shoving more choline in your body via PC. No mention of the cell membrane lipid effect. My local drip clinic has PC drips available which is what Ray does, in some years I might start doing that too. 

      On quantity of suppls, interactions and possible difficulties for your liver, Bill's opinion is that we're taking such good care of ourselves that our livers are lightly loaded anyhow, and plus there's no indication that mixing them as we do has any negatives. Sounds reasonable to me. 

      Reply Like 1
      • BobM
      • BobM
      • 12 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc 

      thanks Dan!

      Yes on testosterone now, along with 250mg metformin (for years). My dose of metformin always seemed low. I supplement that dose with LIfe Extension AMPK activator. Getting on the T was dramatic for me. It made a huge difference. The most impactful of anything (so far😎). 

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 12 days ago
      • Reported - view

      BobM Great! I'm at 250 this week going to 500 next week. And happy days today, my T is coming in finally, I'm expecting good things. We must sound like a bunch of freaks here getting excited about this stuff, but boy am I looking forward to restoring my hormones (free T is low even accounting for age!).  Should have done it a long time ago, but I only discovered LE recently with all of their insight on the subject. They need to work on their marketing to be more West Coast friendly if that makes sense. 

      Reply Like
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 11 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Dan Mc Yes, I've been taking Ray's PC for about a year 2x400mg/d. I recently read something negative about taking PC w/ fish so I have temporarily cut back to 4d/wk. till I figure out more. Thanks for the links to Ray's info and the LEF info! Ray mentions the 3g/d Met on one or more of the recent videos w/ Peter D. Not considering any drips currently.

      Reply Like
      • DanMcL
      • skipping my funeral
      • danmc
      • 10 days ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Dennis Fink Good to know, I was beginning to think I am the only one taking PC! 

      Have you considered PC IV's like Ray does? It's also a therapy in Germany apparently. 

      Reply Like 1
      • Dennis
      • Retired USAF pilot, biochemist.
      • Dennis
      • 10 days ago
      • Reported - view

      DanMcL Don't know anyone locally who does IV's so haven't looked into it since they sound pretty expensive. I would need more evidence of benefit to spend that kind of money!

      Reply Like
  • BrianMDelaney I am trying to order from the Antiaging Clinic. I placed my order on Tuesday. It is now Thursday and no one has contacted me with payment info.  I have sent an email to the clinic, but no response.  Is response time slow? Thanks for your help here. :)

    Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Bailey's Girl I checked and the AAC team have replied twice, please check your spam folder. I understand one of the girl's at AAC will call you today. Please note that they are on GMT, so depending on where you are in the States there is an up-to 8 hour hour time difference in front of you.

      Reply Like 1
    • IAS Phil TY so much for your reply here. Yes, today I got a response from customer service at AAC. It came to my regular mail, as I always copy myself when I write to a new email contact, but it is always good to remind me to check my spam--it is amazing what will be found in that folder!  I was hoping I could pay by wire transfer; however, AAC suggested a different payment method--and I will need to research this method as I know nothing about it. <3 :) 

      Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 3 wk ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Bailey's Girl I'm pleased to hear you've been contacted. The payment option is probably www.Check2Pay.com It works very well for those with American bank accounts; it is simply an e-check that takes approximately 48-hours to make payment, plus your bank phones you to confirm that's what you want to do- before they issue it. It costs you nothing to do this, (unlike a bank wire which can cost $25 or so, although there are now numerous online transfer services who can do it for considerably less). Obviously, you should do what you are comfortable with.

      Reply Like 1
    • IAS Phil  It seems like AAC does accept wire transfer, so I'll most likely utilize this payment method. Thank you so much for your replies here. :)

      Reply Like
  • I have found that it sometimes takes a few days for them to respond to queries. I'm pretty sure this is because remaining compliant with laws and regulations is a tricky matter when it comes to overseas purchases (and shipments) of medications.

    Reply Like 1
    • BrianMDelaney TY for your response here! :) <3

      Reply Like
      • IAS Phil
      • IAS_Phil
      • 8 days ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Bailey's Girl Bailey's Girl the vast majority of orders arrive In 14-21 days, a small percentage can be quicker and slower. If I said 10-28 days it would cover virtually all. Please contact customer care if there are delays past 21 days. NB- there is a phone number as well as an email online now at Antiaging.clinic (after log in).

      Reply Like 1
    • IAS Phil IAS Phil TY so much Phil.  I will wait patiently. <3 :) Running low on my current supply; however, perhaps a small break in Rapamycin won't matter.  I will need to plan with shipping in mind for my next order. 

      Reply Like
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